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Datiea of LegalBoaid. Constitation ofLegal Board. Qnalifloations forobtaining certifloateof LegalBoard. Bnro:ment ofAdvocates. Whereas it is expedient To aBaend the Law regulating the enrolment and admission of persons to practise as advocateshefore the Courts of Cypms. From and after the passing of this Law, no person shall beenrolled as an Advocate to practise before the Courts in Cyprusuntil he shall have obtained the certificate of the Legal Board ashereinafter provided.

There shall be hereby constituted a body of persons, hereinafterreferred to as the "Legal Board," whose duties shall beto receive and decide upou applications from persons desiring tobe enrolled as Advocates, to conduct examinations of such personsfrom time to time, and, subject to the provisions hereinaftercontained, to give to such persons the certificates hereinaftermentioned.

The Legal Board shall be constituted of the following persons; that is to say, 1 the persons for the time being filling the ofiices of Chief Justice, Puisne Judge and Queen's Advocate,respectively, and of such Judges of the District Courts and Advo-. Every person who has been granted a certificate of the LegalBoard shall, on ].

Every person so enrolled shall be entitled to receive a certificateunder the hand of the Chief Justice and the seal of the SupremeCourt stating that he has been enrolled. Every person who has beeu duly admitted to practise as abarrister-at-law, or solicitor, or advocate, or writer to the Signetin Great Britain or Ireland, or has been dulv admitted to practiseas an a. Begistrar ofConrt to issneoeitificate ofattendance. Bnles to be madeby the mghCommissionerAppointmentsecretary andinterpreters.

There shall be kept in the office of every District Court abook in wliich persons intending to qualify the mselves as Advocates,under the provisions of this Law, and who are attending the sittings of a District Court in order to oijtuin the qualificationm'utionod iu sub-section 5 of clause 4 hereof, may enter the irnames and the date of every occasion on which the y so attend the sitting of the Court. Every person Avho has attended one-half of the sittings ofa District Court during a period of twelve consecutive monthsshall be entitle:!

Tiie High Commissioner. Avith the advice and assistanc3 of the Legal Board, may make rules regulating any or all of the followingmalters, that is to say: the place at which the sittings of the Legal Board shall be In Id ; the number of members Avhichshall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business ; the number of examinations to be held in any year and the times atwhicii such examinations shall be held; the times within whichapplications by persons desiring to be examined shall be made to the Legal Board ; the number of the examiners to conduct suchexaminations, and by whom the y shall be appointed, and the feesto be paid to such examiners, and tbe remuneration to be paid toany interpreter o;' intirpreters in respect of any examination.

TLe High Commissiouer shall have power to appoint suchperson or persons to act as secretary and intr'rpreter or interpretersto the Legal Board as may appear to him to be necessary or desirable. No persons shall, after the passing of this Law, be enrolledunder the provisions of clauses , and of the "CyprusCourts of Justice Order, ," This Law may be cited as "The Advocates' Law, Penalties forbreach ofprohibttion.

Whereas it is desirable, in the interests of Agriculture, to prohibit the exportation of Manure. Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advico and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, as follows For the purposes of this Law, "Manure " shall be taken toinclude and mean the solid or liquid excrement of any animul i,whe the r mixed with or absorbed by straw, or o the rwise. Price 3 Piastres. Printed at the Government Printing Office, Nicosia.

For the purposes of this Law, " property" shall. Where any damage or destruction has been caused to propertymaliciously by persons unknown, and the owner the reofshall desire to obtain compensation under this Law, notice of suchdamage or destruciion shall be given by him, or on hia behalf, assoon as possible to the Mukhtar and Commission of the villagewithin the lands of which the property is situate or the damagehas been caused. Should the damage or destruction be caused to property situatewithin the lands of more than one village, notice the reof, asaforesaid, must be given to the Mukhtars and Commissions ofevery such village respectively.

The District Court shall the reupon fix a day for the hearingof such petition, and the petitioner shall serve a copy of the petitionand a notice of the day fixed for the hearing the reof upon the Mukhtar of the said village, and shall post a copy of the petition and a notice of the day fixed for the hearing the reofupon the door of the church and mosque of the said village. The District Court shall proceed to hear the petition on the day fixed for the hearing of the same, or- on any o the r day towhich the same may be adjourned, and, after hearing evidence insupport of the petition and any evidence that may be adduced byany person contrary to the petition, and after taking all such evidenceas the Court shall deem necessary, if the Court shall be ofopinion that the order asked for in the petition ought to issue, itshall give judgment to that effect, and shall issue such orderaccordingly, specifying the rein- the amount of compensation andcosts to be paid to the petitioner by the verghi-payers of the village.

And if the Court shall be of opinion that no snch orderought to issue, it shall give judgment to that effect and dismiss the petition acccordingly. Every judgment or order made by a District Court under the provisions of Sec. After the expiration of the time limited for appealing against the order of the District Court, or after the hearing of such anappeal, the petitioner shall present to the 'District Court a list of the verghi-payers of the village by whom the compensation hasDefinition of" Property.

Petition to befiled. Day to be fixedand notice to beserved. Appeal againstorder. Order of Oonrtupon varghipayera. Power ofMnkhtar. Fea of Mukhtar. Penalty fornegleet olMukhtar. Appeal againstapportlonBant. This Lav not toexempt frompenalties. Fewer to makeBules. Where on the allocation of the amount of compensation andcosts amongst all the verghi-payers of the village, it appears that the amount payable by any vergbi-payer would include a fractionof a piastre which is not represented by any coin current iuCypms, the Court shall direct that the amount to be paid byevery such verghi-payer shall be increased by the addition the retoof so many paras as shall raise the fraction of a piastre, abovementioned, to a sum which is represented by a coin which ia currentin Cyprus, and the amount which the reby is found to exceed the total sum ordered to be paid by the village, as aforesaid, shallbe devoted by the Mukhtar to the school or schools of such villageor to any o the r charitable purpose.

Every order made by a District Court under the provisionsof See. Name of School. Grant forHalf-YearOctober toMarch Grant forHalf-HearApril to September Total GramtforSchool Year Grant forHalf-VearOctober toMarch, Total GrantforSchool Year Yerakioes3 0 03 0 06 0 0SkyUouraEylenja4 10 05 10 05 0 05 10 09 10 0 0Vizakia ; Grant forHalf-YearApril to September 3. Emba -. Grants for the Half-YearOctober ' toMarch Total Gi-antBfor the School Year Sth February, The ordinary annual election of Councillors shalltake place on the 20th day of March in each year.

Every election of Councillors shall be held at the Municipal OflSces between the hours of 9 a. The President of the Municipal Council, or, inhis absence, the Vice-President, shall preside andexercise jurisdiction at every election except at the meeting for the taking of the poll and counting ofvotes.

Both the President and Vice-President of the Municipal Council may, if the y desireit, be present at the counting of votes. The votes shall be counted by the PresidingOfficer as soon as possible after the close of the polland tlie President and Vice-President of the Municipalitymay be present if the y so desire.

Milk SellersMuaici. O the r Musicians excluding thoseen-T. Owners of trees standing near public roadsmust trim such trees so that passengers may not beimpeded by the m. AnJ I do fur the r order that ho make the said liston the l3t day of April, , as directed in the Pro-Iclamatiou of the 1st; day of February, Contractors cantender for one or more, or all the Sections. Full particulars can be obtained by personal applicationat this Office any day between the hours ofd a.

Paloeologos at the next sessionpf the Legislative Council:—" To secure the salaries of the Slchool-mastera ofElementary Public Schools in the villages of the Island. Hth February, TO Rhizo Carpas. Every person delivering locusts at any of the --centres wUl see tliat his locusts are properly weighedby the Memour in charge and that he receives aprinted receipt for the same.

Turkey inEuropeAsia MhiorS. Odessa16th Fete? Liassi, les". In this Law the word " fire-arms " shall be taken to includeand mean any gun, revolver or pistol and any part of any suchweapon. From and after the passing of this Law, no person who hasbeen convicted of any of the following offences, that is to say:—- Homicide,Attempt to commit homicide.

Theft with the aid of arms. Theft with violence,shall have in his possession or under his control fire-arms. The High Commissioner shaU have power and authority,from time to time and at all times when it shall to him seem desirableor necessary to do so, to declare any area within the Island,from a date to be fixed and notified in the Official GazeUe, to bea proclaimed area for the period of one year or for such fur the rperiod as the High Commissioner may think necessary.

Where any area shall have been declared to be a proclaimedarea, as aforesaid, copies of snch proclamation shall be posted inoonspicaous places of all the villages of such area 30 days beforesuch proclaination shall come into force, and it shall be the dutyof all persons who reside or carry on business within the limits ofsnch proclaimed area who have in the ir possession or under the ircontrol any fire-arms, to deliver up such fire-arms to the personor persons authorized by the Govemment to receive the same,before the date of such proclamation coming into force as aforesaid.

All fire-arms which have been delivered up to the personauthorized to receive the same shall be marked with the name of the owner the reof, or of the person deUvering up the same, andon the expiration of the term for which the area was so proclaimed,as aforesaid, such fire-arms may be given up to the persons entitled to receive the same. But it shall be lawful for the Govemment to retain any such fire-arms if it should seemdesirable to do so. FanonaprahQiited fromliSTiiiff fire-anna.

Coiiteiaf proelamattniitobaposted in Tillagaaof pHMdaimedareas. Peaattieafothaviagin isoolaanedFOwer of poiioato Maiehforflis. VenHtjforrefnaaltoaUow search. Kre-anns givcKvptobe markedand Buy be returnedto the owner Oft expiratumoffhapradainatMa. Adult personsxespensible foeflie-arms foundtabonse, tec. Soldiers andpolice exceptedfrom this Law. Tower to oVtainxeimbnTBementfor gamelicenses.

Part of fine maybe awarded toinformer. Power tomakenles. Bepeai of Law of This Law shall not apply to officers and men of HerMajesty's army or navy, or to members of the police force or toconvict guards. It shall be open to any person who holds a game licenseand who has delivered up any fire-arms under the provisions ofthis Law, to apply to the Commissioner of the District to be reimbursedto the amount of such game license, and, upon any suchapplication, it shall be lawful for the said Commissioner to remitto such applicant the whole or any part of the 10s.

Where any person shall have been convicted and sentencedto pay a fine under any of the provisions of this Law, it shall beopen to the Court, in its discretion, to award any portion of suchfine, not exceeding one-half, to any informer who gave informationwhich led to such conviction. It shall be lawful for the High Commissioner, from tinaeto time, to make rules with respect to the special permit and the custody of the fire-arms which are delivered up, and, generally,for the better carrying out of the provisions of this Law.

This Law may be cited as " The Fire-arms Law, Begistration ofjudgment, howto be effected. Memorandum tostate whe the rproperty isregistered. OontentB efmemorandumwhere propertyis registered iuname of debtor. A judgment creditor may, for the time and to the exten the reinafter specified, render any immoveable property in whiciihis judgment debtor is beneficially interested, a security for the payment of his judgment debt by registering his judgment at the Land Registry Office.

Registration of a judgment at the Land Registry OffiOfeshall be effected by depositing at the Office of Land Registry bf the District within which the property sought to be charged issituate, an office copy of the judgment toge the r with a memoraitdum,dated and signed by the judgment creditor or his agehtappointed for that purpose, describing such immoveable propertyin the manner hereinafter specified and stating what interest the judgment debtor has the rein, and claiming that the debtor's interestin such property may remain answerable for the payment of the monies due under the judgment.

Every memorandum mentioned in clause 2 hereof shallstate the name, place of residence and occupation of the nersbiiagainst whose immoveable property the judgment is registered,and shall also state whe the r the property the rein referred to isregistered in the tapou registers of the Land Registry Office ornot, and whe the r the debtor is the person registered as the owneror possessor the reof, and no judgment shall be registered unless the memorandum accompanying the office copy the reof depositedat the Land Registry Office shall contain the particulars reauiredby this clause.

Ii" it be alleged in the memorandum that the propertytbereiti referred LO is registered in the tapou registers of the LaudRegistry Office and thnt any person o the r than the debtor is the person registered as the owner or possessor the reof, the memorandumshall, in addition to the particulars by the preceding clausehereof required to be contained the rein, state by what means the debtor is alleged to have acqiiirei his interest in the property. If it is alleged in the memorandum that tho property the reinreferred to is not registered in the tapou registers of the LandRegistry Office, the description the reof in the memorandum shallstate the nature, boundaries aud extent of sucli property, the name if any of the locality at which aud the name of the villagewithin the lands of which such property is situate, and the nameor names if any by which such property, or any portiou or portionsof it, is or are commonly known.

It shall also state hywhat means the debtor is alleged to have acquired his interest in the property. Registration of a judgment shall ordinarily remain in forcefor one year only from the date when such judgment was firstregistered, but the registration may, from time to time, be prolongedby an order of the Court for any fur the r period or periodsnot exceeding a fur the r period of one year at any one time, andso from time to time.

Notice of any order made under the last preceding clauseshall be given to the Land Registry Office by or on behalf of the judgment creditor and at his expense, by leaving at the officewhere the judgment is registered a notice in writing of the makingof any such order, or an office copy the reof, not later than the day on which, but for the making of such order, the registrationof the judgment would cease to have effect, and where notice onlyis left, as aforesaid, by fur the r leaving an office copy of suchorder at the Land Registry Offioe within 14 days from the daylast aforesaid, and if such office copy or notice and office copy asaforesaid, as the case may require, be not so left at the LandRegistry Office, the creditor shall forfeit the benefit conferred onhim by such order.

The effect of the registration of a judgment shall be asfollows, viz. Where in any memorandum it is alleged ei the r that the property the rein referred to is registered in the books of the LandRegistry Office but that some person o the r than the debtor is fcheperson registered as the owner or possessor the reof, or that the said property is not registered in the said books, or where such propertyis not registered in the said books in the name of the debtoras fcheowner or possessor the reof, whatever may be the allegationin that behalf contained in the memorandum, the n, at any timewhile the registration of the judgment shall remain in force, the Court may, upon the application of the judgment creditor, by itsorder, restrain any o the r person not being a creditor whose debtContents ofmemorandumwhere propertyis registered inname of o the rperson thandebtor.

Contents ofmemorandumwhere propertynot registered. Duration ofregistration. Notice ot orderto be given atLand BegistryOfaoe. Effaot ofregistrationon propertyregistered in the name of the debtor. Writ of sale ofImmoTeableproperty. Provided always that no such order as last hereinbefore mentionedshall be made unless notice of the application for suchorder be given to every transferee or mortgagee, and unless the Court shall be of opinion that the description of the property containedin the memorandum was sufficient to affect any suchtraasferee or mortgagee with notice of the judgment creditor'sclaim on snch property, Where property shall be ordered to be sold in pursuance ofany order made under the authority of this clause, the remedy ofany person into whose name it may have been transferred or towhom it may have been mortgaged, shall be in damages onlyagainst the person by whom the property was granted, assignedor mortgaged to him.

Whenever any judgment that has been registered shall,while the registration the reof remains in force be satisfied, it shallbe the duty of the judgment creditor to give notice in writing the reof at the office where the judgment is registered. The proper officer of Land Registry shall enter in a bookto be kept for that purpose a note of the date of the registrationat the Land Registry Office of every judgment, and of the names,places of residence and ordinary occupations of ali persons againstwhose immoveable property, or any part the reof, any judgmenthas been registered, and of the date of any order made under the provisions of clause 7 hereof for prolonging the registration otsuch judgment and of the period for which the registration is the reby prolonged.

Such book shall also show the namo of the village where suchlands are situate. Such book, toge the r with the office copies of judgments andmemoranda deposited at the Land Registry Office under the provisionsof clause 2 hereof, shall be open to inspection. No writ of sale of immoveable property shall be issuedexcept on an apphcation to the Court, the judgment of which issought to be executed, or a judge the reof, notice of such applicationhaving been fii-st given to the debtor, and every such writShaU be signed by the judge, or one of the judges, directing the issue the reof.

No writ of sale of immoveable property shall remain inforce for a longer period than one year from the date of the issuingof the same. Part III. Effect of writdirecting Balegenerally. Writ for sale ttproperty notroistered inname of debtee. Keeping abro the l in adisorderly way tobe an offence.

Whereas it is desirable to amend "The Municipal CouncilsLaw, There shall be added to Section 25 of " The Municipal CouncilsLaw, 1H85," the ioilowing words : "Every person who keepsany brotlicd or disorderly hou-e in a disorderly manner, or in such away that it becomes an annoyance to the inhabitants. On convictionfor certainoffences a portionof the fine maybe awarded to the informer.

Power to HighCommissioner topermit the killing of wildbirds or the taking of eggs in the interests ofscience. Whercfis it ig expedient, in the interest of locust destructionthat " The Wild Birds Law, ," le repealed. This Law may l. The cultivation of tobacco shall be free, but no tobaccogrowershall be entitled to cultivate tobacco ou a smaller extentof land than half a douum, which must be ei the r situate at oneplace or composad of several pieces of land situate within the confines of a town, village or farm.

Registration, Sale and Inspection. In every District the re shall be a Commission, called " TheRegistration Commissiou," which shall consist oi' three members,one of whom shall be appointed by the Director of Excise, ano the relected by the District Administrative Council, and the thirdelected by tbe Mukhtar and Azas of tbe place where the tobaccoplantations are situate. Such Commissions shall, before tobaccois ga the red in, proceed to the tobacco plantations aud record the place, quantity of donums, and the uame and residence of the tobacco-srCO wer, in books kept for that purpose by the said Commisaiou, the members of which shall at be end of the work ofeach day place thoir signatures at the foot of such entries.

Such Commissions shall also, after the tobacco is ga the red in anddried, proceeri to ascertain the quantity the reof by meaus ofweighing, and enter into the books kapt by it the quantity thusascertained, and shall fittest every such entry by affixing the signatures "of the members the reto. The Registration Commissiou snail imraediafceiy give to the tobacco-grower a statement in writing signed by its members andsetting forth the quantity of tobacco, the extent of tbe tobaccoplantation, and the name, surname and residence of the tobaccogrower.

Such written statement, hereinafter called '' certificate,"shall be cut ofi" from a counterfoil book kept by a member of the said Commission appointed for that purpose by the Director ofExcise, and the contents of such written statement shall also benoted on the counterfoil. In case the said certificate shall belost, a copy tliereof made out from the entries oa tbe counterfoilshall be issued by the Director of Excise on the written applicationof the tobacco-grower.

After such visit of the Registration Commission, made asaforesaid for the purpose of ascertaining the quantity of the tobacco, the tobacco-grower shall be at liberty to sell or exporthis tobacco, ei the r wholly or in portions, or to manufacture part the reof for his own use, subject to the following formalities:— I.

The quantity of tobacco sold or exported shall not be lessthan five okes and shall be weighed in the presence of anExcise officer, who shall make on the certificate in the bands of the tobacco-grower, a note of the quantity of tobacco sold or exported, the name of the purchaser or the place to which it iaexported, and shall attest such note by his signature.

The quantities of tobacco to be manufactured for the useof the tobacco grower shall not altoge the r exceed the amount often okes in each year, and shall be delivered to a tobacco factoryto be manufactured in the presence of an Excise Officer, whoshall note the quantity of such manufactured tobacco on the certificateof the tobacco-grower and shall attest such note by hissignature.

On the completion of the registration and ascertainment of the quantity of tobacco, the Director of Excise shall, in specialbooks, open separate accounts for the tobacco-growers of eachDistrict, and in every such account shall state the extent of the tobacco plantations and the ascertained quantities of tobacco,and shall subsequently mp.

Every year, some days before the tobacco is ga the red in, the Registration Commissioners shall proceed to inspect andcheck, by means of lists prepared previously by the Director ofExcise, the qunnti! Tobacco- Traders. The premises to be used for the storing of tobacco shall bestated in the application, and no change shall be made in the premises to be so used without the permission of the Director ofExcise. Every tobacco-trader shall be subject to the payment of aproper remuneration for the Excise Officer who shall attend athis store, ei the r at fixed periods, or occasionally, whenever areceipt or delivery of tobacco is to take place, and who mayaccompany him also to villages in order to take a note of the quantity of tobacco that may be bought and taken over.

Every tobacco-trader shall keep a store book, numberedand sealed by the Director of Excise, in which he shall enter indetail all lodgments or withdrawals of tobacco from his store, andevery such entry shall be attested with his signature and that of the Excise Officer.

The tobacco in the hands of the tobacco-traders shall notbe sold or exported in quantities of less than five okes each. Whenever a tobacco-trader sluill lodge in or withdraw fromhis stores any tobacco, his account in the books kept by the Director of Excise shall, in accordance with the informationgiven to tho said Director by tho officers under him, be creditedor debited by such Director.

The Director of Excise shall, for the purpose of cheoking the existing stock, be entitled to visit once or twice every year,through the officers under him, the stores of the tobacco-traders'and shall for that purpose compare the aforesaid stock with the books and, if the amount of such stock, after making an allowanceof t'. The premises to be used as a tobacco factory shall be statedin the apphcation, and no change shall be made in the premisesto be so used without the permission of the Director of ExciseSuch premises should be in a suitable locality and have no communicationwith any adjoining buildings.

Every tobacco-manufacturer shall be required to pav the requisite salary for an Excise Officer, who shall be attached tobis tobacco-factory. Every tobacco-manufacturer shall keep a store book numberedand sealed by the Director of Excise, in which he shallenter in detail all lodgments in and withdrawals from his tobaccofactoryof tobacco and shall attest each such entry bv his ownsignature and that of the Excise Officer.

Every tobacco-manufacturer shall of right be deemed to bfiClauses 9, 10, 11, 12, LS and 14 of this Law,and shall lodge all. No tobacco manufactured in a tobacco-factory shall betaken out from such factory except in packets or cases bearingspecial excise banderolles, which shall be previously bought by the tobacco-manufacturer from the Director of Excise and 'whichshall state the quantity and quality of the tobacco containedunder the m.

Besides the Excise banderolles, any tobacco manufacturedfor sale shall also he covered with printed private banderolles,bearing in printed letters the name and surname of the tobaccomanufacturerand the locality and number of the tobacco-factorf.

All tobacco manufactured in tobacco-factories and placed inpackets or cases covered with excise banderolles shall be allow'eda deduction of five per cent, for loss in weight, and if such tobaccpon being weighed shall shew a deficiency exceeding the amountallowed as aforesaid, the packets or cases shall be opened for the purpose of making up the weight fixed by the law, and the damage that shall be thus caused by the cancellation of the excise banderolles shall be a charge on the tobacco-manufacturer.

Tobacco bought and manufactured by various persons. It shall be lawful for every person to purchase tobacco for the purpose of manufacturing the same for his own use subjectto the following conditions, namely:— I. The maximum quantity of tobacco to be bought by anjsuch person for such use shall be ten okes in each year ; II. The tobacco bought as aforesaid shall be weighed andtaken over in the presence of an Excise Officer, who shall give the purchaser a certificate stating the quantity purchased andconfirmed by his signature ; III.

Such tobacco shall be delivered to a tobacco-factory formanufacture and shall be accompanied by the certificate of the purchaser on which the Excise Officer of such tobacco-factoryshall make a note of the quantity of tobacco deUvered for manufacture. The Director of Excise shall, in accordance with the informationthat shaU be given him by the officers under him, recordin his books a statement of the tobacco bought by each personand delivered to tobacco-factories for manufacture, and shall fromtime to time make examination with a view to ascertain the quantities of tobacco in the hands of such purchasers.

No oue shaU be entitled to sell by retaU any manufacturedtobujcos without previously obtaining a written license from the. Director of Excise. Such written license shall be granted onpayment of a yearly or half-yearly fee, payable on the 1st ofMarch and the 1st of September in each year.

The sii nation of the shop of the tobacco-seller shall bedefined in the license and shall not be changed without the consentof the Director of Excise, and shall at all times be subjectto a visit of inspection on the part of any Excise Officer. Penal Provisions. Every person who shall I. Cultivate any tobacco on an extent of land smaller than thatprescribed by law ; II. Use any tobacco before its being manufactured in atobacco factory ; IV. SeU, or export, or manufacture any tobacco before the RegistrationCommission shall have made its visit for the purposeof ascertaining the quantity the reof ; II.

Conceal his tobacco, or part the reof, at the time the Registration Commission makes its visit for the purpose ofascertaining the quantity the reof ;shall be liable to the payment of a fine not exceeding 1 shilUng forevery oke of tobacco so sold, exported, manufactured or hidden. Every person who shall without license I. Trade in tobacco ; II. Establish a tobacco factory for the manufacture of tobacco; III.

General Provisions. It shall be lawful for the High Commissioner in Council tomake, from time to time, rules and regulations to be published in the Official Gazette for the protection of the fees and duties and for the appointment, salary, romuneration and regulation of the dutiesof the persons entrusted with the carrying out of this Law.

Suchrules and regulations shall have the same force and effect as if the yformed part of this Law. This Law may be cited as "The Tobacco Law, ," andshall come into force on the 1st of January, From and after thc passing of this Law, the plantation andcultivation of trees shall be compulsory in the manner herein-belowprovided for. The Agricultural Board must, from time to time, on investigationand enquiry, make a report to the High Commissioner of the Island pointing out locahties in private lands suitable for plantationsof trees, the names of the owners of such private lands, the kind orkinds and number of the trees to be planted in each year and the season for the plantation of such trees.

It shall be lawful for the High Comniissioner in Council, on the report above-mentioned of the Agricultural Board, to issue anOrder directing the compulsory plantation and cultivation of treesin fixed locahties in private lands. Such order shaU specify the kind or kinds of the trees, the seasonat which such trees should be planted, and the number of suchtrees to be planted in each year, and shall also state the names of the owners of such private lands.

Such order shall be pubUshed in the Official Gazette and a copy the reof shall be posted in a conspicuous place of the viUage within the area of which such compulsory plantation and cultivation oftrees has been directed as aforesaid. Any owner of any land wherein a compulsory plantation andcultivation of trees has been directed, as aforesaid, shall be boundto plant the number and kind of trees specified in the order at the season fixed for the same, and to provide also for the future goodcultivation of such planted trees.

With a view to facilitating the purposes of this Law, it shaUbe lawful to the Government to grant to the owners of such lands,as aforesaid, from its own nurseries, such trees o the r than fruitproducingtrees as may be specified in such order for compulsoryplantation.

Every land-owner not complying whoUy or partiaUy with the provisions of the High Commissioner's order mentioned in Clause 3,and every land-owner wilfully and maliciously neglecting the cultivationof the trees planted under the order in question, shaU beguUty of an offence under this Law, and shaU be Uable to a fine notexceeding shilUngs for every such offence.

The District Commissioners shaU be bound, through the Officersunder the m, to investigate and enquire about the fulfilment of the obligations imposed hereby on owners of private lands and tosue every such offender before the District Court within the jurisdictionof which the locahties included in the High Commissioner'sorder are situate. Any fines recovered for offences of this Law shaU be handedover hy the District Commissioner to the Mukhtar of the yiUage towhich the person fined belongs, in order to be paid by him to the treasury of the school or schools of such viUage, and, in default ofany such school, such fine shall be sent by the District Commissionerto the treasury of the Agricultural Board.

In this Law the word " tree " shaU mean and include aU kindsof trees, whe the r fruit producing or o the rwise. Stuart Oliver tobe a District Medical Officer. POLI No. MARCH 2nd, Furniture and Bq. Slaughter-house Fees 58 10 0Weighing and Measuring Fees Contributions to poor and necessitouspeople 24 16Expenses of Cleaning 10 19Expenses of Repairing Roads Dat;d SthP.

High Commissioner. WHEREAS by clause 1 of " The Ti the Ordinance,," it is provided that the ti the on all cropsafld o the r produce shall be taken in money and notin kind unless the High Commissioner in Coxmcilshall, prior to the month of April in any year, directthat the ti the on any crop or o the r produce for thatyear?

And whereas it has been shewn that it is expedientthat the ti the on all Olives grown on that portionof the Kyrenia range of mountains known as the Kambili Forest, including olives grown on treesclaimed by the Kathari Monastery and situated in the localities called "Placca," "Pikrathassia," "Platania"and "Pendelies" within the said forest, for the year , should be taken in kind and not iu mouey.

Now know ye that, in exercise of the powers vestedin him by "The Ti the. Ordinance, ," and by andwith tbe advice of his Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, andit is hereby ordered, that the ti the on the Olivesaforesaid for the year shall be taken in kindand not iu money. Now, the refore, the High Commissioner in Council,in virtue of the powers in him vested as aforesaid, ispleased to order, and it is hereby ordered, that allpayments in kind.

Given under the hand and official seal of the HighCommissioner at Nicosia this 20th day of February, And whereas the said Order in Council defined the limits within which the said Municipal Council shouldhave such powers, rights and duties, as aforesaid, tobe as follows : The village of Karavas toge the r with the monastery and landing places of Acheropiti, the western boundary of the Municipality being the RiverYathikaka.. Now, the refore, His Excellency the High Commissionerin Council, under the powers vested in bim by" The Municipal Councils' Law, ," is pleased toorder, and it is hereby ordered, as follows An election of Municipal Councillors for the village of Karavas shall be held in the ofiices of the Commissioner of Kyrenia between the hours of 9.

That the rate of interest to be paid in respect ofsuch loan shall not exceed five per cent, per annum. Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 20fch day ofFebruary, Government House, Nicosia,16th January, Buxton is reported to have repHed interms implying that harbour works are being carriedon at that place. This reply, which haa been reproduced in the local press, has created some surprise here, and Ishould be glad to know whe the r Mr.

Buxton has beencorrectly reported. There is an annual sum for publicworks, part of which is laid out on the harbours, Ibelieve. The Rt. The Marquis of Ripon, K. Downing Street. Buxton in the House of Commons withregard to the expenditure on the harbour of Famagustawas imperfectly reported in the press, Mr. Buxtonhaving added, after the words reported, words to the following effect " but this is only for repairs, and iinot expenditure- of the nature indicated by the HonourableMember.

You are at liberty to publish this despatch if youthink proper. Sendall, K. All persons objecting to the delimitation stated in the said reports to have been made, must carry in the ir objections the reto within six months from the date hereof. Salamis, Blocks I. Ayios Khariton, near Ayios Khari:ou. Footand mouth diseaseGlanders amongsthorses ; anthraxamongst cattle andhorses.

The sulK,Mipri. Applications to be made to the Chief Secretary to Government,. Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, asfollows:—The Law " To make Temporary Provision to Protect the Claims of Ecclesiastical Corporations to certam Properties inCyprus" shall continue in force and operation for a fur the rperiod oT two years from the date of the expiration the reof.

In reviewing the year that has passed since I lastaddressed you from this place, I have to congratulateyon upon one of the largest cereal harvests ever knownin Cyprus. The quantities of barley, oats and wheatwhich were assessed for ti the , ranged from 25 per cent,in the case of barley, to more than 60 per cent, in the case of wheat, above the quantities for ; while the assessment in vetches was considerably more than per cent, over that of the preceding year.

The yield of o the r crops has been an average one,but the y too have been affected by the prevailingcommercial depression. Carobs were about an average crop, but the priceshave been lower than the y were last year. The vintage has been an excellent one, the manufactureof black wine showing an increase of 68 percent, over that of last year, and I am assured that the quality is good; but the prices of this importantcommodity continue to be very low. I fear that the low prices obtainable for all commoditieswill have an unfavourable effect upon the revenue, which will not be as high as that of the year The system of taking cereal ti the s in kind in the whole of the Island has been continued and has provedas successful as it was last year.

Cholera, I regret to say, again broke out in Europeand in neighbouring countries, and the riovernmentwas compelled to take precautionary measures to preventits introduction into Cyprus, which involvedsome interference with the trade of the Island. It is with regret that I record that the outbreak ofthis disease amongst the pilgrims at Mecca caused the death of many inhabitants of Cypnis, and tbat wehave to deplore the loss of some of the most resix;ctedmembers of the Mahomedan community.

The estimaces for the expenditure of the comii;gyear have been prepared and will be laid before you. On the recommendation of tbe Agricultural Board the Government has sanctioned, as an experiment, animportant change in the system of locust destructionfor this year. The system adopted consists in offering a liberalorice for locusts actually collected and brought in tofixed stations, where the y will be wt-itjlied anddestroyed.

During the last Session of the Council the re wasconsiderable discussion about the Land Registry Office. After careful consideration it has been determinedto discontinue the Revenue Survey which has forsome time been in progress, and proposals will be laidbefore you for devoting the money hi the rto expendedon that Survey to improving the existing staff andrecords of the Land Registry Office.

Several matters which want of time prevented the Council from deahug with last year will again bebrought forward and I commend the m to your mostearnest consideration. The draft of a law to deal with the testamentarydisposition of property will again be laid before you,and I would suggest the fur the r considei-ation of it bya Select Committee with a view of bringing its provisionsinto harmony with the wishes and circumstancesof the community. Bills have been prepared by the Govemment, andalso by an Elected Member of the Council, for dealingwith the quahfications, appointment and payment ofteachei-s in elementary schools, and with o the r mattersconnected with education.

The proposals embodied in the se draft bills will besubmitted for your consideration, and I rely withconfidence upon your assistance and co-operation in soframing the se measures as to render the m an effectivebasis of legislation upon this important subject. A Bill was passed at the last Session of the Councilto deal with the admission and enrolment of Advocates,but I was unable to give my assent to it in the form in which it was passed. The Bill will again belaid before you and I trust that the form in which itis now drafted will be acceptable to the Council.

Amongst the o the r measures which you will beasked to consider the most important are the following:A Bill to consolidate and amend the Laws relatingto the administration of the estates of deceasedOttoman subjects. A Bill to regulate the admission of certain evidencein criminal cases.

A Bill to facilitate the recovery of possession ofTenements after the termination of the tenancy; anda measure, which I am informed is of great importanceto the agricultural interests, prohibiting the exportationof manure. It is my most anxious desire, in nhich I am sureyou will all participate, that the coming Session maybe prodnctiA'c of such legislative results as may proveof lasting benefit to the welfare and prosperity of the Island.

The Council shares your Excellency's gratificationat the abundant cereal harvest of the past yearand it regrets that the prices in foreign markets werenot favourable. The Council also regrets that the general conditionof the Island has not. The Council considers it its duty to call the attention of the Government to the exceptional positionof thc Island in regard to foreign markets, where itsproduce is burdened with heavy duties, and it considersthat Cyprus should ei the r enjoy the privileges concededby foreign countries to British trade or that it shouldhave the same rights which the former Government of the Island had and can still obtain by Conventions.

It is to be regretted that, although the crop ofcarobs was small, the prices were low. The Councilinvites the attention of the Govemment to the damagecaused to carob trees in some parts of the Island by the ravages of an insect and of rats. As regards thc question of cholera, the Councilcan but repeat its recommendations that the Governmentsliould continue to ttikc. The Council thanks your Excellency for the measures that have been adopted for the destructionof locusts.

These measures have been rej eatedly recommendedby the Council and the y are, in its opinion, the best. The Council urges the Government to see that the se measures are carried out with regularity andintegrity and, as far as the Elective Members are concerned, the y will not fail to do all in the ir power tourge the inhabitants to give the ir assistance in amatter that so closely concerns the m.

The Council has heard with regret of the aboUtionof the Revenue Survey aud thinks that, as the rehas so often been a question about this matter, it maybe allowed to add that the Council has never askedfor such abolition. What it censured and considered illegal and unjustwas the assessment which is made at the new registrationbecause it is not authorised by any law, andbecause it always resulted in favour of the Govemmentand to the detriment of the owners of land, as itwas a partial one.

The Council awaits with anxiety to hear the measures of which your Excellency makes mentioaifor the improvement of the Land Registry Office, the radical reorganization of which the Council has repeatedlyand earnestly recommended.

The Council observes that your Excellency haspassed over in silence the most defective branch of the public service— the Police, but it is confident thatyour Excellency has given your earnest care to the recommendations that have been specially made aboutthis Department, which is a most important one fromevery point of view.

Lastly the Council warmly recommends to yourExcellency that you will call the earnest attention ofHer Majesty's Government to the fact that the peopleof Cyprus are no longer able, without being ruined, topay the most exhausting taxes which are beyond itsfinancial means to pay and for the collection of whicha great part of the moveable and immoveable propertyof the tax-payers has been put up to forced sale by the Govemment.

The Council will give its best consideration toall bills that may be laid before it. The Police Force had not failed. The Councilwill be invited to consider measures to place the Forceon a satisfactory and efficient footing. Ihe Cyprus Gatette may be obtained on payment of a subscription of. The subscription includes postage.

This Law may be cited as " The Forest Law, Printed at the Govemment Printing Office, Nicosia. And Whereas, by the said Order, it was, amongsto the r things, provided that the High Commissionershould publish the said Order by Proclamation at suchtime as he thinks fit, and should, in such Proclamation,name a day on which the Order should takeeffect.

Now the refore I, Walter Joseph Sendall, the saidHigh Commissioner, do by this my Proclamationhereby publish the said Order of Her Majesty TheQueen in Council of the 23rd day of November, ,and do hereby name the 1st day of April, , as the day on which the said Order shall take effect. Given at Nicosia this 10th day of March, UNDER the power and authority vested in him by"ThePost Office Ordinance ," and by andwith the advice of the Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order,and it is hereby ordered, that, from and after the 1stday of April, , the rate of postage'to be chargedby or under the Island Postmaster in respect of everysingle newspaper or periodical and supplement notexceeding 2 ozs.

Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 1st day ofMarch, IN exercise of the powers vested in him by "The Post Office Ordinance, ," and with the advice of the Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, and it is herebyordered, that, from and after the publication of this order in the Official Gazette, the following rates ofpostage shall be charged by or under the Island Postmaster in respect of parcels posted in Cyprus for conveyanceto the undermentioned places.

For a Parcel not exceeding n weight1 lb. Bechuanaland Protectorate IMashonaland Protectorate ISIduday of' March, ,And Whereas ittia desirable that ano the r dayshouldbe fixed in lieu of the said 12th day of March. Now the refore, His ExGellenfiy. Given- under the hand and official seal of the HighCommissioner at Nicoeia this 6th day of Maroh,i Given under the hand and official seal of- the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 12th day ofMarch, ,R.

Stationery and PrintingCourt expenses ContingenciesBalance in hand on the Slst December, Yearended the 31st of Dec, ,. Dated 18th Feb. Dated 21st February, New, the refore, in exercise of the powers vested inhim by "The Burials Law, ," His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, and it ishereby ordered, that new burial-grounds shall beprovided in lieu of those hereinbefore mentioned.

Table shoiving the Rainfall registered at the variousOhservatories in Cyprvs during the month of February, Greatest fall in 24 hrs. Number ofAmount. Dated the 15th day of March, Marshals of the said Court. Bovine TyphusCattle PlagueF.

Secretary to Government. Applications to be made to. Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, as follows:—1. In addition to the sums already appropriated to the service of the Queen under Her Majesty's Orders in Council of the 80th ofNovember, section 27 , and of the 3rd of August, , the re shall be issued and applied to the service of the twelvemonths ending the thirty-first day of March, , any sum notexceeding the sum of ninety-eight thousand, seven hundred andseventy-three pounds for defraying the charge of the Governmentof Cyprus for such period.

This Law may be cited as " The Appropriation Law, Short Title. His Excellency the High Commissioner Legislative Council Chief Secretary 2, Government Printing Office Receiver-General 12, Audit Public Works and Store Department 1, Public Works 10, Land Registration and Revenue Survey 2, Forests 3, District Establishments 11, Customs and Excise 6, Post Office 2, Law and Justice Education 4, Police 24, Prisons 6, Crown Agents Pensions 1, Printed at the Government Printing Uffice, Nicosia.

The Cjrprus Gazette Published by Authority. Grant forQuarterJanuary 1 toMarch 31, Grant forQuarterApril 1 toJune 30, Grant forQuarterJuly 1 toSeptember 30,. Total Grantfor year Grant forQaarterJantiary 1 toMarch 31, Grant forQuarterApril! July 1 toSeptember Grant tatQuarterOctober 1 toDecember 31,S. Total Grantfor Year Grant forQuarterJanuary 1 toMarch Grant forQnarterApril 1 toJune 30, Grant forQuarterJuly 1 toSeptember 30, Grant forQuarterOctober 1 toDecember 31, Agirda10 01 5 Amount Granted.

Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 30th day ofMarch, Balanfee, viz. MdriTbif,Honorary SecrOdrf. Balance in hand 1st January, 0 8Donations and Subcriptions Balance, viz. Examined and found correct. The particulars respecting the saflie'xian be seen onapplication at the Chief Secretary's Office. The Treaty can be see on application at the Chief. Secretary's Office. Fconsequence of an outbreak of small pox at Bhodesand near Alaya on the Caramanian Coast, HisExceUency the High Commissioner, under the powerand authority vested in him by "The InfectiousDiseases Prevention Ordinance, ," has beenpleased to order that all passengers arriving the ncewill be submitted to tbe following regulations beforebeing aUowed to land in Cyprus:Any vessel arriving at any port in Cyprus, except Larnaca,from Rhodes and near Alaya with passengers forCyprus is to be medically inspected before being admittedto pratique, and, in flie event of the re beingany case, or suspected case, of small pox on board,pratique will be refused, and the vessel is to be orderedto proceed to Lamaca, a note to that eflfect beingmade-on the.

Notioe is hereby given that, on and after the Istof April, , permission will be given, on applicationto the Commissioner of Kyrenia, to graze in the undermentioned Forest. The Buffavento Forest28th March, Fisher, retired. Vitalis, Clerk, Receiver-General's Office, toact, temporarily, as Island Treasurer, from the 1stof April, , until fur the r orders.

Dated19th January, Dated Ist January, His Excellency has aho been pleased to confirm the following officer in his appointment:—Mr. Glossopto be the President of the said Commission. And- in fur the r exercise of his said powers. HisExcellency the High Commissioner is pleased herebyto order as follows That plants within the said area so declared tdbe infected, as aforesaid, may be sprayed, pruned,and o the rwise cleaned and disinfected by the Inspectorof Agricultural Industries or his agents.

That the Inspector of Agricultural Industries andhis agents be authorised to enter upori any land within the said area so declared to be infected, as aforesaid,and to do all such o the r acts and things as may beexpedient with the exception of uprooting or destroyingany tree in order to combat with or destroy the causes of the said plant disease and to previeht the spreading of the same. Sth AprU, W , of the 19th January, , it is herebynotified that the next Cxaiiiination in the ModernGreek language, and if any candidates notify- the irintention of presenting the mselves , in the Turkishlanguage, will be held at Limassol on the 25th inst.

HE undermentioned gentleman, having compliedT with the conditions contained in Gazette No, 55of June 22nd, , has been duly entered in the medical register aa entitled to practise medicine in the Island of Cyprus:—Licensed topractise asMedical manof the first class.

Qualificationsderived fromA the ns. Fur the r particulars can be had at the Forest Office. The-conditions under whieh tho contract will benade can be ascertained at the Office of the Cosptmisraeaerof Nicosia. KING,, Commissioner.

Cleaning the TowQ. Wf No. Balance in hand. Prioe 2 Piastres. The subscnption includes postage. AppUcattortTbe mLe to. Where it is found desirable, from any cause, that any Reportmade under the provisions of Sec. Where it has heen found desirable to revise, amend or alterany Report, as aforesaid, and any new proprietors have been added the reto, as aforesaid, under the provisions of Sec. Nothing in this Law shall exempt any contributor from the payment of any contribution which has,- before any such revision,amendment or alteration, as aforesaid, become due and payable.

Power of HighOonuaiaiioiier toOlder oontcibntionto paymentof works. Wot to exemptconttibatonfrom payment ofsnms due. Deflnitien ofXaanre. PeaaltiM forbreaohofprohibition. IL, For the purposes of this Law, "Manure" shall be taken toinclude and mean the solid or liquid excrement of any animals,whe the r mixed with or absorbed by straw, or o the rwise. Passed in Council this seventh day of March, in the yearof Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four.

Clerk of Council. Definitian ofcertain terms. Appointment ofOoroners andDeputy Coroners. Notice of deathto be given toPolieeaadtoCoroner. The Coroner shall take all such evidence as it is possiblefor him to procure, as to the identity of the deceased, and as to the uuuse of death, and, lur that. Every witness, before being examined, shaU be required totake an oath in the form prescribed in Schedule A. A Coroner shall not be bound by any rules of evidencewhich may pertain to civU or criminal proceedings.

The Coroner shall take down in writing, in the form of anarrative, all oral evidence given before him at the inquest, andshall, on the termination of the evidence of each witness, readover the notes of the evidence given by such witness, and suchwitness shall sign, or make his mark at the foot or end of the notes of the evidence so given by him as aforesaid. The Coroner may, at any time, adjourn an inquest, at anystage, to any future day to be fixed by him, or to any place withinhis jurisdiction, which he may deem to be desirable.

After having taken all the evidence which is desirable ornecessary to be taken, the Coroner shall draw up and sign anote, stating his finding as to the cause of death, and whe the rany and what person or persons has caused the same. Should the evidence, in the opinion of the Coronei,warrant a charge of homicide being brought against any person, the Coroner shall have power to issue warrants of arrest of anysuch person or persons, ordering him or the m to be broughtbefore a Magisterial CourtSuch warrants shall be directed to any Peace OflBcer, and shallhave the same force and eflfect as warrants of arrest issued by aMagisterial Court.

Where the Coroner finds that some person is criminallyresponsible for having caused the death, he shall forward withall despatch to the Local Commandant of Police of the Districthis finding, toge the r with the notes of the evidence, unless the Local Commandant of Police shall have held the inquest himself. Where the finding does not, in the opinion of the Coroner,warrant a charge of homicide being brought against any person, the Coroner shall forward the finding, toge the r with tlie notes ofevidence, to the Chief Secretary to Government.

Where, before or during the holding of an inquest, anyperson has been charged with, or arrested upon a charge of,causing the death of the person, the cause of whose Jeath is the subject of such inquest, the Coroner may allow, such person tobe present at the inquest, and to put any questions ei the r inpersou or by his advocate to the witnesses.

And in case such person may be desirous of making a statemjBntto the Coroner, it shall be the duty of the Cori i. Where it shall seem desirable to a Coroner tb;:. A Coroner may, ei the r of his own motion, or on the applicationof any person, within his jurisdiction, summon anypersQU to attend any inquest and give evidence, or produce anydocument in his possession, and may examine such person as awitness, or require him to produce any document in his possession,subject to all just exceptions.

Any person being required to give evidence upon aninquest who refuses to take au oath, or to make a declaration inlieu the reof, or who refuses to answer any question, or to produceany document in his possession,. Grigsby, from the 27th January, , and tjintil fur the r orders. Benjamin Travers, the Commissioner of Famngusta, and Mr. TheodorosMichnelides to be members of a Commission to exerciseand perform tlie duties of a Municipal Oouncilfor tbo Municipal District of Famagusta, andfur the r to re-appoint Mr.

Benjamin Travers to be the President of the said Commission. And whereas, upon the petition of certain of the inhabitant householders of the town for which suchMunicipal Commission was appointed requesting thata Municipal Council may be elected in the place of the said Municipal Commission, it has seemed good toHis Excellency in Council to order that an election ofa Municipal Council for the Munioipal District ofFamagusta shall be held.

Now, the refore, His Excellency the High Commissionerin Council, under the powers vested in hiui by" The Municipal Councils' Law, ," is pleased toorder, and it is hereby ordered as follows An election of Municipal Councillors for the Municipal District of Famagusta shall be held in the offices of the Commissioner of Famagusta between the hours of 10 a. The Municipal Council shall be composed ofeight Councillors. The President of the Municipal Commission shallpreside at the election. In case of a Poll being reqmred, the ballot shalltake place on Monday, the 12th day of March, ,at the offices of the Municipal Commission between the hourti of 10 a.

The Councillors elected under the provisions ofthis Order sliall come into office on Monday, the 2ndday of AprU, Four of such Councillors namely,three Christians and one Moslem shall go out ofoffice on the 1st of April, , and the remainderon the 1st of April, , and the order in which suchCouncniors shall go out of office shall be regulatedby the Council in accordance with " The MunicipalCouncils' Ordinance, ITH reference to Notification No. Wodehouse's appointmentas a Local Commandant of Police is 1st January, T is notified that Volume I.

Price TenShillings. ImN exercise of the powers vested in me in that behalfby the Order of Her Majesty in Council bearingdate the SOth day of November, , and altering the constitution of the Legislative Council of Cyprus;I, Walter Joseph Sendall, Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and SaintGeorge, Her Majesty's High Commissioner and Commander-in-Chiefin and over the Island of Cyprus, dohereby appoint the officers mentioned in the Schedulehereunder written severally to make lists in respect of the several Nahiehs written opposite the ir respectivenames in the said Schedule of all persons, beingpayers of Verghi in respect of any such Nahieh, whoshall be at the time of the making of such listsqualified to be registered as voters at the election ofMembers of the Legislative Council for the ElectoralDistrict in which such Nahieh is situate.

Officers appointed to make Lists of Voters. LoizouYoanni TheocharidesK. Given at Nicosia this 1st day of February, The Leper Farm, Nicosia, shall be under the direct control of the Chief Medical Officer, who shallvisit it at least once a week, and oftener if required. The Secretary of the said Leper Farm shallvisit the same at least twice a week, and shall noteany complaints that the inmates may make andtransmit the same to the Chief Medical Officer.

He shall keep a register of the inmates in whichshall be recorded the name, age and sex of each inmate, the village and district from which the y come, the ir previous occupation, date of admission into the Leper Farm, the length of time afflicted, andwhe the r the y have any relations affected aud sucho the r particulars as the Chief Medical Officer maydirect. He shall keep all books relating to the expenditureat the Leper Farm and regularly, iortnightly ormonthly, as the case may be, jxTsonally make paymentto the lepers of the allowanc granted by the Government, and he shall keep all correspondencerelating to the lepers and the said Leper Farm.

The Superintendent of the said Leper Farmshall reside in the apartments prov' Id For him at the Farm, and shall not absent him eli for more. He shall visit the quarters of the lepers and everypart of the asylum at least once a day and shall seethat the directions of the Chief Medical Officer areihoronghly carried out.

The Chief Medical Officer shall be responsiblefor the maintenance of good order and discipline in the Leper Farm. The Superintendent, under the Chief MedicalOfficer, shall be responsible for the cleanliness andgeneral discipline of the asylum, and shall havecontrol over the attendants employed the rein. Visitors shall see the ir friends in the room setapart for that purpose, unless the person visited bebed-ridden,IV. Any inmate who refuses or neglects to perform the duty or work assigned to him, or is gniltyof misconduct or of any breach of discipline or goodorder, shall be deemed to be guilty of a breach ofBegulations.

One or more rooms shall be set apart by the Chief Medical Officer in the said Leper Farm for the purposes of a prison, in which lepers ordered toundergo a sentence of imprisonment shall undergo the ir sentence, and the Superintendent sliall have aUpowers for the detention and custody of leperssentenced to imprisonment, as are by Law vested inPrison Warders. All inmates, without exception, in so far as the yare able, are required to engage in such work or employmentin or for the benefit of the said LeperFarm, in such capacity and for such length of time as the Superintendent, with the approval of the ChiefMedical Offioer, may direct.

Any priest performing such marriage ceremonywithout the permission of the High Commissionershall be debarred from holding any fur the r appointmentin the said Leper Farm, The priest shall perform all the rehgious offices,except marriage, required of him in the asylum andshall hold services regularly on Sundays and Saints'Days in the said Farm Chapel.

He is strictly forbidden to attempt to proselytizeany leper who may happen to be of a different religion. Tbe servants employed in the Leper Farm shallassist those lepers who are unable to take care of the mselves, wash the ir clothing and keep the ir roomsclean and tidy. Ist Febmary, All sovereigns and half sovereigns which shew a-deficiency in weight of gold exceeding 3 c.

Price One Shilling. Achillea Apoatolides, the boundaries beipgon two sides road, and on two sides land of AchilleaApostolides, consisting of square feet, as specifiedby plan, for the purposes of public utility, to wit, the continuation of the public road or street of Iphigeneia. PripB 5 Pi etp Any person who ahall carry, or have, on or about his person,any dagger knife, shall be guilty of an offence, and for everysuch offence shall be liable to a fine not exceeding and everysuch dagger knife shall be forfeited; Provided always thatnothing in this Law contained shall be held to prevent the carrying of a dagger knife by any person in the exercise of anylawful trade or business, who shall prove that at the time suchdagger knife was found it was necessary that he' should so carryit, or have it on or about his person, for the purposes of histrade or business.

Provided alwaysthat it shall be lawful for the Chief Secretary, under his hand, tolicense any person to import, or to manufacture, sell or disposeof, upon any premises to be specified, dagger knives, for the purposes of any particular trade or business.. Where any person shall have obtained such license as ismentioned iii Sec.

And every entry in the register. It shall not be lawful for any person who has obtainedsuch a license as is mentioned in Sec. Every register to be kepi in accordance with the provisionsof this LaviT shall be open to inspection by the Commissioner of the District.

It shall be lawful for the High Commissioner, with the advice and assistance of the Chief Justice, to make Rules withrespect to the form of licouso and form of register mentioned inthis Law. This Law may be cited as " The Knives Law, ,"luterpretatioaof " daggerknife.

Unlawful toimport or disposeof dagger knivesexcept under alicense from the Chief Secretary. SeUer to besatisfied thatknife is bona fiderequired. Begister to beopea to inspeation. Power to makeBoles. Short title. Notioe to quit tobe served ontenant. MatnstcrialOourt n. Where it has been found desirable to revise, amend or alterany Report, as aforesaid, and any new proprietors have been added the reto, as aforesaid, under the provisions of Sec. Incorporationwith iRigationand Water Law, Power of High.

Power of HighCommissioner toorder contributionto paymentol works. Not to exemptconttitmtorafrom paynuBt otsums due. Datiea of LegalBoaid. Constitation ofLegal Board. Qnalifloations forobtaining certifloateof LegalBoard. Bnro:ment ofAdvocates. Whereas it is expedient To aBaend the Law regulating the enrolment and admission of persons to practise as advocateshefore the Courts of Cypms.

From and after the passing of this Law, no person shall beenrolled as an Advocate to practise before the Courts in Cyprusuntil he shall have obtained the certificate of the Legal Board ashereinafter provided. There shall be hereby constituted a body of persons, hereinafterreferred to as the "Legal Board," whose duties shall beto receive and decide upou applications from persons desiring tobe enrolled as Advocates, to conduct examinations of such personsfrom time to time, and, subject to the provisions hereinaftercontained, to give to such persons the certificates hereinaftermentioned.

The Legal Board shall be constituted of the following persons; that is to say, 1 the persons for the time being filling the ofiices of Chief Justice, Puisne Judge and Queen's Advocate,respectively, and of such Judges of the District Courts and Advo-. Every person who has been granted a certificate of the LegalBoard shall, on ]. Every person so enrolled shall be entitled to receive a certificateunder the hand of the Chief Justice and the seal of the SupremeCourt stating that he has been enrolled.

Every person who has beeu duly admitted to practise as abarrister-at-law, or solicitor, or advocate, or writer to the Signetin Great Britain or Ireland, or has been dulv admitted to practiseas an a. Begistrar ofConrt to issneoeitificate ofattendance.

Bnles to be madeby the mghCommissionerAppointmentsecretary andinterpreters. There shall be kept in the office of every District Court abook in wliich persons intending to qualify the mselves as Advocates,under the provisions of this Law, and who are attending the sittings of a District Court in order to oijtuin the qualificationm'utionod iu sub-section 5 of clause 4 hereof, may enter the irnames and the date of every occasion on which the y so attend the sitting of the Court.

Every person Avho has attended one-half of the sittings ofa District Court during a period of twelve consecutive monthsshall be entitle:! Tiie High Commissioner. Avith the advice and assistanc3 of the Legal Board, may make rules regulating any or all of the followingmalters, that is to say: the place at which the sittings of the Legal Board shall be In Id ; the number of members Avhichshall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business ; the number of examinations to be held in any year and the times atwhicii such examinations shall be held; the times within whichapplications by persons desiring to be examined shall be made to the Legal Board ; the number of the examiners to conduct suchexaminations, and by whom the y shall be appointed, and the feesto be paid to such examiners, and tbe remuneration to be paid toany interpreter o;' intirpreters in respect of any examination.

TLe High Commissiouer shall have power to appoint suchperson or persons to act as secretary and intr'rpreter or interpretersto the Legal Board as may appear to him to be necessary or desirable. No persons shall, after the passing of this Law, be enrolledunder the provisions of clauses , and of the "CyprusCourts of Justice Order, ," This Law may be cited as "The Advocates' Law, Penalties forbreach ofprohibttion. Whereas it is desirable, in the interests of Agriculture, to prohibit the exportation of Manure.

Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advico and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, as follows For the purposes of this Law, "Manure " shall be taken toinclude and mean the solid or liquid excrement of any animul i,whe the r mixed with or absorbed by straw, or o the rwise.

Price 3 Piastres. Printed at the Government Printing Office, Nicosia. For the purposes of this Law, " property" shall. Where any damage or destruction has been caused to propertymaliciously by persons unknown, and the owner the reofshall desire to obtain compensation under this Law, notice of suchdamage or destruciion shall be given by him, or on hia behalf, assoon as possible to the Mukhtar and Commission of the villagewithin the lands of which the property is situate or the damagehas been caused.

Should the damage or destruction be caused to property situatewithin the lands of more than one village, notice the reof, asaforesaid, must be given to the Mukhtars and Commissions ofevery such village respectively. The District Court shall the reupon fix a day for the hearingof such petition, and the petitioner shall serve a copy of the petitionand a notice of the day fixed for the hearing the reof upon the Mukhtar of the said village, and shall post a copy of the petition and a notice of the day fixed for the hearing the reofupon the door of the church and mosque of the said village.

The District Court shall proceed to hear the petition on the day fixed for the hearing of the same, or- on any o the r day towhich the same may be adjourned, and, after hearing evidence insupport of the petition and any evidence that may be adduced byany person contrary to the petition, and after taking all such evidenceas the Court shall deem necessary, if the Court shall be ofopinion that the order asked for in the petition ought to issue, itshall give judgment to that effect, and shall issue such orderaccordingly, specifying the rein- the amount of compensation andcosts to be paid to the petitioner by the verghi-payers of the village.

And if the Court shall be of opinion that no snch orderought to issue, it shall give judgment to that effect and dismiss the petition acccordingly. Every judgment or order made by a District Court under the provisions of Sec.

After the expiration of the time limited for appealing against the order of the District Court, or after the hearing of such anappeal, the petitioner shall present to the 'District Court a list of the verghi-payers of the village by whom the compensation hasDefinition of" Property.

Petition to befiled. Day to be fixedand notice to beserved. Appeal againstorder. Order of Oonrtupon varghipayera. Power ofMnkhtar. Fea of Mukhtar. Penalty fornegleet olMukhtar. Appeal againstapportlonBant. This Lav not toexempt frompenalties. Fewer to makeBules. Where on the allocation of the amount of compensation andcosts amongst all the verghi-payers of the village, it appears that the amount payable by any vergbi-payer would include a fractionof a piastre which is not represented by any coin current iuCypms, the Court shall direct that the amount to be paid byevery such verghi-payer shall be increased by the addition the retoof so many paras as shall raise the fraction of a piastre, abovementioned, to a sum which is represented by a coin which ia currentin Cyprus, and the amount which the reby is found to exceed the total sum ordered to be paid by the village, as aforesaid, shallbe devoted by the Mukhtar to the school or schools of such villageor to any o the r charitable purpose.

Every order made by a District Court under the provisionsof See. Name of School. Grant forHalf-YearOctober toMarch Grant forHalf-HearApril to September Total GramtforSchool Year Grant forHalf-VearOctober toMarch, Total GrantforSchool Year Yerakioes3 0 03 0 06 0 0SkyUouraEylenja4 10 05 10 05 0 05 10 09 10 0 0Vizakia ; Grant forHalf-YearApril to September 3. Emba -. Grants for the Half-YearOctober ' toMarch Total Gi-antBfor the School Year Sth February, The ordinary annual election of Councillors shalltake place on the 20th day of March in each year.

Every election of Councillors shall be held at the Municipal OflSces between the hours of 9 a. The President of the Municipal Council, or, inhis absence, the Vice-President, shall preside andexercise jurisdiction at every election except at the meeting for the taking of the poll and counting ofvotes. Both the President and Vice-President of the Municipal Council may, if the y desireit, be present at the counting of votes. The votes shall be counted by the PresidingOfficer as soon as possible after the close of the polland tlie President and Vice-President of the Municipalitymay be present if the y so desire.

Milk SellersMuaici. O the r Musicians excluding thoseen-T. Owners of trees standing near public roadsmust trim such trees so that passengers may not beimpeded by the m. AnJ I do fur the r order that ho make the said liston the l3t day of April, , as directed in the Pro-Iclamatiou of the 1st; day of February, Contractors cantender for one or more, or all the Sections.

Full particulars can be obtained by personal applicationat this Office any day between the hours ofd a. Paloeologos at the next sessionpf the Legislative Council:—" To secure the salaries of the Slchool-mastera ofElementary Public Schools in the villages of the Island. Hth February, TO Rhizo Carpas. Every person delivering locusts at any of the --centres wUl see tliat his locusts are properly weighedby the Memour in charge and that he receives aprinted receipt for the same.

Turkey inEuropeAsia MhiorS. Odessa16th Fete? Liassi, les". In this Law the word " fire-arms " shall be taken to includeand mean any gun, revolver or pistol and any part of any suchweapon. From and after the passing of this Law, no person who hasbeen convicted of any of the following offences, that is to say:—- Homicide,Attempt to commit homicide.

Theft with the aid of arms. Theft with violence,shall have in his possession or under his control fire-arms. The High Commissioner shaU have power and authority,from time to time and at all times when it shall to him seem desirableor necessary to do so, to declare any area within the Island,from a date to be fixed and notified in the Official GazeUe, to bea proclaimed area for the period of one year or for such fur the rperiod as the High Commissioner may think necessary.

Where any area shall have been declared to be a proclaimedarea, as aforesaid, copies of snch proclamation shall be posted inoonspicaous places of all the villages of such area 30 days beforesuch proclaination shall come into force, and it shall be the dutyof all persons who reside or carry on business within the limits ofsnch proclaimed area who have in the ir possession or under the ircontrol any fire-arms, to deliver up such fire-arms to the personor persons authorized by the Govemment to receive the same,before the date of such proclamation coming into force as aforesaid.

All fire-arms which have been delivered up to the personauthorized to receive the same shall be marked with the name of the owner the reof, or of the person deUvering up the same, andon the expiration of the term for which the area was so proclaimed,as aforesaid, such fire-arms may be given up to the persons entitled to receive the same. But it shall be lawful for the Govemment to retain any such fire-arms if it should seemdesirable to do so.

FanonaprahQiited fromliSTiiiff fire-anna. Coiiteiaf proelamattniitobaposted in Tillagaaof pHMdaimedareas. Peaattieafothaviagin isoolaanedFOwer of poiioato Maiehforflis. VenHtjforrefnaaltoaUow search. Kre-anns givcKvptobe markedand Buy be returnedto the owner Oft expiratumoffhapradainatMa. Adult personsxespensible foeflie-arms foundtabonse, tec.

Soldiers andpolice exceptedfrom this Law. Tower to oVtainxeimbnTBementfor gamelicenses. Part of fine maybe awarded toinformer. Power tomakenles. Bepeai of Law of This Law shall not apply to officers and men of HerMajesty's army or navy, or to members of the police force or toconvict guards. It shall be open to any person who holds a game licenseand who has delivered up any fire-arms under the provisions ofthis Law, to apply to the Commissioner of the District to be reimbursedto the amount of such game license, and, upon any suchapplication, it shall be lawful for the said Commissioner to remitto such applicant the whole or any part of the 10s.

Where any person shall have been convicted and sentencedto pay a fine under any of the provisions of this Law, it shall beopen to the Court, in its discretion, to award any portion of suchfine, not exceeding one-half, to any informer who gave informationwhich led to such conviction. It shall be lawful for the High Commissioner, from tinaeto time, to make rules with respect to the special permit and the custody of the fire-arms which are delivered up, and, generally,for the better carrying out of the provisions of this Law.

This Law may be cited as " The Fire-arms Law, Begistration ofjudgment, howto be effected. Memorandum tostate whe the rproperty isregistered. OontentB efmemorandumwhere propertyis registered iuname of debtor. A judgment creditor may, for the time and to the exten the reinafter specified, render any immoveable property in whiciihis judgment debtor is beneficially interested, a security for the payment of his judgment debt by registering his judgment at the Land Registry Office.

Registration of a judgment at the Land Registry OffiOfeshall be effected by depositing at the Office of Land Registry bf the District within which the property sought to be charged issituate, an office copy of the judgment toge the r with a memoraitdum,dated and signed by the judgment creditor or his agehtappointed for that purpose, describing such immoveable propertyin the manner hereinafter specified and stating what interest the judgment debtor has the rein, and claiming that the debtor's interestin such property may remain answerable for the payment of the monies due under the judgment.

Every memorandum mentioned in clause 2 hereof shallstate the name, place of residence and occupation of the nersbiiagainst whose immoveable property the judgment is registered,and shall also state whe the r the property the rein referred to isregistered in the tapou registers of the Land Registry Office ornot, and whe the r the debtor is the person registered as the owneror possessor the reof, and no judgment shall be registered unless the memorandum accompanying the office copy the reof depositedat the Land Registry Office shall contain the particulars reauiredby this clause.

Ii" it be alleged in the memorandum that the propertytbereiti referred LO is registered in the tapou registers of the LaudRegistry Office and thnt any person o the r than the debtor is the person registered as the owner or possessor the reof, the memorandumshall, in addition to the particulars by the preceding clausehereof required to be contained the rein, state by what means the debtor is alleged to have acqiiirei his interest in the property.

If it is alleged in the memorandum that tho property the reinreferred to is not registered in the tapou registers of the LandRegistry Office, the description the reof in the memorandum shallstate the nature, boundaries aud extent of sucli property, the name if any of the locality at which aud the name of the villagewithin the lands of which such property is situate, and the nameor names if any by which such property, or any portiou or portionsof it, is or are commonly known.

It shall also state hywhat means the debtor is alleged to have acquired his interest in the property. Registration of a judgment shall ordinarily remain in forcefor one year only from the date when such judgment was firstregistered, but the registration may, from time to time, be prolongedby an order of the Court for any fur the r period or periodsnot exceeding a fur the r period of one year at any one time, andso from time to time.

Notice of any order made under the last preceding clauseshall be given to the Land Registry Office by or on behalf of the judgment creditor and at his expense, by leaving at the officewhere the judgment is registered a notice in writing of the makingof any such order, or an office copy the reof, not later than the day on which, but for the making of such order, the registrationof the judgment would cease to have effect, and where notice onlyis left, as aforesaid, by fur the r leaving an office copy of suchorder at the Land Registry Offioe within 14 days from the daylast aforesaid, and if such office copy or notice and office copy asaforesaid, as the case may require, be not so left at the LandRegistry Office, the creditor shall forfeit the benefit conferred onhim by such order.

The effect of the registration of a judgment shall be asfollows, viz. Where in any memorandum it is alleged ei the r that the property the rein referred to is registered in the books of the LandRegistry Office but that some person o the r than the debtor is fcheperson registered as the owner or possessor the reof, or that the said property is not registered in the said books, or where such propertyis not registered in the said books in the name of the debtoras fcheowner or possessor the reof, whatever may be the allegationin that behalf contained in the memorandum, the n, at any timewhile the registration of the judgment shall remain in force, the Court may, upon the application of the judgment creditor, by itsorder, restrain any o the r person not being a creditor whose debtContents ofmemorandumwhere propertyis registered inname of o the rperson thandebtor.

Contents ofmemorandumwhere propertynot registered. Duration ofregistration. Notice ot orderto be given atLand BegistryOfaoe. Effaot ofregistrationon propertyregistered in the name of the debtor. Writ of sale ofImmoTeableproperty. Provided always that no such order as last hereinbefore mentionedshall be made unless notice of the application for suchorder be given to every transferee or mortgagee, and unless the Court shall be of opinion that the description of the property containedin the memorandum was sufficient to affect any suchtraasferee or mortgagee with notice of the judgment creditor'sclaim on snch property, Where property shall be ordered to be sold in pursuance ofany order made under the authority of this clause, the remedy ofany person into whose name it may have been transferred or towhom it may have been mortgaged, shall be in damages onlyagainst the person by whom the property was granted, assignedor mortgaged to him.

Whenever any judgment that has been registered shall,while the registration the reof remains in force be satisfied, it shallbe the duty of the judgment creditor to give notice in writing the reof at the office where the judgment is registered.

The proper officer of Land Registry shall enter in a bookto be kept for that purpose a note of the date of the registrationat the Land Registry Office of every judgment, and of the names,places of residence and ordinary occupations of ali persons againstwhose immoveable property, or any part the reof, any judgmenthas been registered, and of the date of any order made under the provisions of clause 7 hereof for prolonging the registration otsuch judgment and of the period for which the registration is the reby prolonged.

Such book shall also show the namo of the village where suchlands are situate. Such book, toge the r with the office copies of judgments andmemoranda deposited at the Land Registry Office under the provisionsof clause 2 hereof, shall be open to inspection. No writ of sale of immoveable property shall be issuedexcept on an apphcation to the Court, the judgment of which issought to be executed, or a judge the reof, notice of such applicationhaving been fii-st given to the debtor, and every such writShaU be signed by the judge, or one of the judges, directing the issue the reof.

No writ of sale of immoveable property shall remain inforce for a longer period than one year from the date of the issuingof the same. Part III. Effect of writdirecting Balegenerally. Writ for sale ttproperty notroistered inname of debtee. Keeping abro the l in adisorderly way tobe an offence.

Whereas it is desirable to amend "The Municipal CouncilsLaw, There shall be added to Section 25 of " The Municipal CouncilsLaw, 1H85," the ioilowing words : "Every person who keepsany brotlicd or disorderly hou-e in a disorderly manner, or in such away that it becomes an annoyance to the inhabitants. On convictionfor certainoffences a portionof the fine maybe awarded to the informer. Power to HighCommissioner topermit the killing of wildbirds or the taking of eggs in the interests ofscience.

Whercfis it ig expedient, in the interest of locust destructionthat " The Wild Birds Law, ," le repealed. This Law may l. The cultivation of tobacco shall be free, but no tobaccogrowershall be entitled to cultivate tobacco ou a smaller extentof land than half a douum, which must be ei the r situate at oneplace or composad of several pieces of land situate within the confines of a town, village or farm.

Registration, Sale and Inspection. In every District the re shall be a Commission, called " TheRegistration Commissiou," which shall consist oi' three members,one of whom shall be appointed by the Director of Excise, ano the relected by the District Administrative Council, and the thirdelected by tbe Mukhtar and Azas of tbe place where the tobaccoplantations are situate. Such Commissions shall, before tobaccois ga the red in, proceed to the tobacco plantations aud record the place, quantity of donums, and the uame and residence of the tobacco-srCO wer, in books kept for that purpose by the said Commisaiou, the members of which shall at be end of the work ofeach day place thoir signatures at the foot of such entries.

Such Commissions shall also, after the tobacco is ga the red in anddried, proceeri to ascertain the quantity the reof by meaus ofweighing, and enter into the books kapt by it the quantity thusascertained, and shall fittest every such entry by affixing the signatures "of the members the reto. The Registration Commissiou snail imraediafceiy give to the tobacco-grower a statement in writing signed by its members andsetting forth the quantity of tobacco, the extent of tbe tobaccoplantation, and the name, surname and residence of the tobaccogrower.

Such written statement, hereinafter called '' certificate,"shall be cut ofi" from a counterfoil book kept by a member of the said Commission appointed for that purpose by the Director ofExcise, and the contents of such written statement shall also benoted on the counterfoil.

In case the said certificate shall belost, a copy tliereof made out from the entries oa tbe counterfoilshall be issued by the Director of Excise on the written applicationof the tobacco-grower. After such visit of the Registration Commission, made asaforesaid for the purpose of ascertaining the quantity of the tobacco, the tobacco-grower shall be at liberty to sell or exporthis tobacco, ei the r wholly or in portions, or to manufacture part the reof for his own use, subject to the following formalities:— I.

The quantity of tobacco sold or exported shall not be lessthan five okes and shall be weighed in the presence of anExcise officer, who shall make on the certificate in the bands of the tobacco-grower, a note of the quantity of tobacco sold or exported, the name of the purchaser or the place to which it iaexported, and shall attest such note by his signature. The quantities of tobacco to be manufactured for the useof the tobacco grower shall not altoge the r exceed the amount often okes in each year, and shall be delivered to a tobacco factoryto be manufactured in the presence of an Excise Officer, whoshall note the quantity of such manufactured tobacco on the certificateof the tobacco-grower and shall attest such note by hissignature.

On the completion of the registration and ascertainment of the quantity of tobacco, the Director of Excise shall, in specialbooks, open separate accounts for the tobacco-growers of eachDistrict, and in every such account shall state the extent of the tobacco plantations and the ascertained quantities of tobacco,and shall subsequently mp.

Every year, some days before the tobacco is ga the red in, the Registration Commissioners shall proceed to inspect andcheck, by means of lists prepared previously by the Director ofExcise, the qunnti! Tobacco- Traders. The premises to be used for the storing of tobacco shall bestated in the application, and no change shall be made in the premises to be so used without the permission of the Director ofExcise.

Every tobacco-trader shall be subject to the payment of aproper remuneration for the Excise Officer who shall attend athis store, ei the r at fixed periods, or occasionally, whenever areceipt or delivery of tobacco is to take place, and who mayaccompany him also to villages in order to take a note of the quantity of tobacco that may be bought and taken over. Every tobacco-trader shall keep a store book, numberedand sealed by the Director of Excise, in which he shall enter indetail all lodgments or withdrawals of tobacco from his store, andevery such entry shall be attested with his signature and that of the Excise Officer.

The tobacco in the hands of the tobacco-traders shall notbe sold or exported in quantities of less than five okes each. Whenever a tobacco-trader sluill lodge in or withdraw fromhis stores any tobacco, his account in the books kept by the Director of Excise shall, in accordance with the informationgiven to tho said Director by tho officers under him, be creditedor debited by such Director.

The Director of Excise shall, for the purpose of cheoking the existing stock, be entitled to visit once or twice every year,through the officers under him, the stores of the tobacco-traders'and shall for that purpose compare the aforesaid stock with the books and, if the amount of such stock, after making an allowanceof t'. The premises to be used as a tobacco factory shall be statedin the apphcation, and no change shall be made in the premisesto be so used without the permission of the Director of ExciseSuch premises should be in a suitable locality and have no communicationwith any adjoining buildings.

Every tobacco-manufacturer shall be required to pav the requisite salary for an Excise Officer, who shall be attached tobis tobacco-factory. Every tobacco-manufacturer shall keep a store book numberedand sealed by the Director of Excise, in which he shallenter in detail all lodgments in and withdrawals from his tobaccofactoryof tobacco and shall attest each such entry bv his ownsignature and that of the Excise Officer.

Every tobacco-manufacturer shall of right be deemed to bfiClauses 9, 10, 11, 12, LS and 14 of this Law,and shall lodge all. No tobacco manufactured in a tobacco-factory shall betaken out from such factory except in packets or cases bearingspecial excise banderolles, which shall be previously bought by the tobacco-manufacturer from the Director of Excise and 'whichshall state the quantity and quality of the tobacco containedunder the m. Besides the Excise banderolles, any tobacco manufacturedfor sale shall also he covered with printed private banderolles,bearing in printed letters the name and surname of the tobaccomanufacturerand the locality and number of the tobacco-factorf.

All tobacco manufactured in tobacco-factories and placed inpackets or cases covered with excise banderolles shall be allow'eda deduction of five per cent, for loss in weight, and if such tobaccpon being weighed shall shew a deficiency exceeding the amountallowed as aforesaid, the packets or cases shall be opened for the purpose of making up the weight fixed by the law, and the damage that shall be thus caused by the cancellation of the excise banderolles shall be a charge on the tobacco-manufacturer.

Tobacco bought and manufactured by various persons. It shall be lawful for every person to purchase tobacco for the purpose of manufacturing the same for his own use subjectto the following conditions, namely:— I. The maximum quantity of tobacco to be bought by anjsuch person for such use shall be ten okes in each year ; II. The tobacco bought as aforesaid shall be weighed andtaken over in the presence of an Excise Officer, who shall give the purchaser a certificate stating the quantity purchased andconfirmed by his signature ; III.

Such tobacco shall be delivered to a tobacco-factory formanufacture and shall be accompanied by the certificate of the purchaser on which the Excise Officer of such tobacco-factoryshall make a note of the quantity of tobacco deUvered for manufacture. The Director of Excise shall, in accordance with the informationthat shaU be given him by the officers under him, recordin his books a statement of the tobacco bought by each personand delivered to tobacco-factories for manufacture, and shall fromtime to time make examination with a view to ascertain the quantities of tobacco in the hands of such purchasers.

No oue shaU be entitled to sell by retaU any manufacturedtobujcos without previously obtaining a written license from the. Director of Excise. Such written license shall be granted onpayment of a yearly or half-yearly fee, payable on the 1st ofMarch and the 1st of September in each year. The sii nation of the shop of the tobacco-seller shall bedefined in the license and shall not be changed without the consentof the Director of Excise, and shall at all times be subjectto a visit of inspection on the part of any Excise Officer.

Penal Provisions. Every person who shall I. Cultivate any tobacco on an extent of land smaller than thatprescribed by law ; II. Use any tobacco before its being manufactured in atobacco factory ; IV. SeU, or export, or manufacture any tobacco before the RegistrationCommission shall have made its visit for the purposeof ascertaining the quantity the reof ; II.

Conceal his tobacco, or part the reof, at the time the Registration Commission makes its visit for the purpose ofascertaining the quantity the reof ;shall be liable to the payment of a fine not exceeding 1 shilUng forevery oke of tobacco so sold, exported, manufactured or hidden.

Every person who shall without license I. Trade in tobacco ; II. Establish a tobacco factory for the manufacture of tobacco; III. General Provisions. It shall be lawful for the High Commissioner in Council tomake, from time to time, rules and regulations to be published in the Official Gazette for the protection of the fees and duties and for the appointment, salary, romuneration and regulation of the dutiesof the persons entrusted with the carrying out of this Law.

Suchrules and regulations shall have the same force and effect as if the yformed part of this Law. This Law may be cited as "The Tobacco Law, ," andshall come into force on the 1st of January, From and after thc passing of this Law, the plantation andcultivation of trees shall be compulsory in the manner herein-belowprovided for. The Agricultural Board must, from time to time, on investigationand enquiry, make a report to the High Commissioner of the Island pointing out locahties in private lands suitable for plantationsof trees, the names of the owners of such private lands, the kind orkinds and number of the trees to be planted in each year and the season for the plantation of such trees.

It shall be lawful for the High Comniissioner in Council, on the report above-mentioned of the Agricultural Board, to issue anOrder directing the compulsory plantation and cultivation of treesin fixed locahties in private lands.

Such order shaU specify the kind or kinds of the trees, the seasonat which such trees should be planted, and the number of suchtrees to be planted in each year, and shall also state the names of the owners of such private lands. Such order shall be pubUshed in the Official Gazette and a copy the reof shall be posted in a conspicuous place of the viUage within the area of which such compulsory plantation and cultivation oftrees has been directed as aforesaid.

Any owner of any land wherein a compulsory plantation andcultivation of trees has been directed, as aforesaid, shall be boundto plant the number and kind of trees specified in the order at the season fixed for the same, and to provide also for the future goodcultivation of such planted trees. With a view to facilitating the purposes of this Law, it shaUbe lawful to the Government to grant to the owners of such lands,as aforesaid, from its own nurseries, such trees o the r than fruitproducingtrees as may be specified in such order for compulsoryplantation.

Every land-owner not complying whoUy or partiaUy with the provisions of the High Commissioner's order mentioned in Clause 3,and every land-owner wilfully and maliciously neglecting the cultivationof the trees planted under the order in question, shaU beguUty of an offence under this Law, and shaU be Uable to a fine notexceeding shilUngs for every such offence.

The District Commissioners shaU be bound, through the Officersunder the m, to investigate and enquire about the fulfilment of the obligations imposed hereby on owners of private lands and tosue every such offender before the District Court within the jurisdictionof which the locahties included in the High Commissioner'sorder are situate.

Any fines recovered for offences of this Law shaU be handedover hy the District Commissioner to the Mukhtar of the yiUage towhich the person fined belongs, in order to be paid by him to the treasury of the school or schools of such viUage, and, in default ofany such school, such fine shall be sent by the District Commissionerto the treasury of the Agricultural Board.

In this Law the word " tree " shaU mean and include aU kindsof trees, whe the r fruit producing or o the rwise. Stuart Oliver tobe a District Medical Officer. POLI No. MARCH 2nd, Furniture and Bq. Slaughter-house Fees 58 10 0Weighing and Measuring Fees Contributions to poor and necessitouspeople 24 16Expenses of Cleaning 10 19Expenses of Repairing Roads Dat;d SthP.

High Commissioner. WHEREAS by clause 1 of " The Ti the Ordinance,," it is provided that the ti the on all cropsafld o the r produce shall be taken in money and notin kind unless the High Commissioner in Coxmcilshall, prior to the month of April in any year, directthat the ti the on any crop or o the r produce for thatyear?

And whereas it has been shewn that it is expedientthat the ti the on all Olives grown on that portionof the Kyrenia range of mountains known as the Kambili Forest, including olives grown on treesclaimed by the Kathari Monastery and situated in the localities called "Placca," "Pikrathassia," "Platania"and "Pendelies" within the said forest, for the year , should be taken in kind and not iu mouey.

Now know ye that, in exercise of the powers vestedin him by "The Ti the. Ordinance, ," and by andwith tbe advice of his Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, andit is hereby ordered, that the ti the on the Olivesaforesaid for the year shall be taken in kindand not iu money.

Now, the refore, the High Commissioner in Council,in virtue of the powers in him vested as aforesaid, ispleased to order, and it is hereby ordered, that allpayments in kind. Given under the hand and official seal of the HighCommissioner at Nicosia this 20th day of February, And whereas the said Order in Council defined the limits within which the said Municipal Council shouldhave such powers, rights and duties, as aforesaid, tobe as follows : The village of Karavas toge the r with the monastery and landing places of Acheropiti, the western boundary of the Municipality being the RiverYathikaka..

Now, the refore, His Excellency the High Commissionerin Council, under the powers vested in bim by" The Municipal Councils' Law, ," is pleased toorder, and it is hereby ordered, as follows An election of Municipal Councillors for the village of Karavas shall be held in the ofiices of the Commissioner of Kyrenia between the hours of 9.

That the rate of interest to be paid in respect ofsuch loan shall not exceed five per cent, per annum. Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 20fch day ofFebruary, Government House, Nicosia,16th January, Buxton is reported to have repHed interms implying that harbour works are being carriedon at that place.

This reply, which haa been reproduced in the local press, has created some surprise here, and Ishould be glad to know whe the r Mr. Buxton has beencorrectly reported. There is an annual sum for publicworks, part of which is laid out on the harbours, Ibelieve.

The Rt. The Marquis of Ripon, K. Downing Street. Buxton in the House of Commons withregard to the expenditure on the harbour of Famagustawas imperfectly reported in the press, Mr. Buxtonhaving added, after the words reported, words to the following effect " but this is only for repairs, and iinot expenditure- of the nature indicated by the HonourableMember. You are at liberty to publish this despatch if youthink proper.

Sendall, K. All persons objecting to the delimitation stated in the said reports to have been made, must carry in the ir objections the reto within six months from the date hereof. Salamis, Blocks I. Ayios Khariton, near Ayios Khari:ou.

Footand mouth diseaseGlanders amongsthorses ; anthraxamongst cattle andhorses. The sulK,Mipri. Applications to be made to the Chief Secretary to Government,. Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, asfollows:—The Law " To make Temporary Provision to Protect the Claims of Ecclesiastical Corporations to certam Properties inCyprus" shall continue in force and operation for a fur the rperiod oT two years from the date of the expiration the reof.

In reviewing the year that has passed since I lastaddressed you from this place, I have to congratulateyon upon one of the largest cereal harvests ever knownin Cyprus. The quantities of barley, oats and wheatwhich were assessed for ti the , ranged from 25 per cent,in the case of barley, to more than 60 per cent, in the case of wheat, above the quantities for ; while the assessment in vetches was considerably more than per cent, over that of the preceding year.

The yield of o the r crops has been an average one,but the y too have been affected by the prevailingcommercial depression. Carobs were about an average crop, but the priceshave been lower than the y were last year. The vintage has been an excellent one, the manufactureof black wine showing an increase of 68 percent, over that of last year, and I am assured that the quality is good; but the prices of this importantcommodity continue to be very low.

I fear that the low prices obtainable for all commoditieswill have an unfavourable effect upon the revenue, which will not be as high as that of the year The system of taking cereal ti the s in kind in the whole of the Island has been continued and has provedas successful as it was last year. Cholera, I regret to say, again broke out in Europeand in neighbouring countries, and the riovernmentwas compelled to take precautionary measures to preventits introduction into Cyprus, which involvedsome interference with the trade of the Island.

It is with regret that I record that the outbreak ofthis disease amongst the pilgrims at Mecca caused the death of many inhabitants of Cypnis, and tbat wehave to deplore the loss of some of the most resix;ctedmembers of the Mahomedan community. The estimaces for the expenditure of the comii;gyear have been prepared and will be laid before you. On the recommendation of tbe Agricultural Board the Government has sanctioned, as an experiment, animportant change in the system of locust destructionfor this year.

The system adopted consists in offering a liberalorice for locusts actually collected and brought in tofixed stations, where the y will be wt-itjlied anddestroyed. During the last Session of the Council the re wasconsiderable discussion about the Land Registry Office.

After careful consideration it has been determinedto discontinue the Revenue Survey which has forsome time been in progress, and proposals will be laidbefore you for devoting the money hi the rto expendedon that Survey to improving the existing staff andrecords of the Land Registry Office. Several matters which want of time prevented the Council from deahug with last year will again bebrought forward and I commend the m to your mostearnest consideration.

The draft of a law to deal with the testamentarydisposition of property will again be laid before you,and I would suggest the fur the r considei-ation of it bya Select Committee with a view of bringing its provisionsinto harmony with the wishes and circumstancesof the community. Bills have been prepared by the Govemment, andalso by an Elected Member of the Council, for dealingwith the quahfications, appointment and payment ofteachei-s in elementary schools, and with o the r mattersconnected with education.

The proposals embodied in the se draft bills will besubmitted for your consideration, and I rely withconfidence upon your assistance and co-operation in soframing the se measures as to render the m an effectivebasis of legislation upon this important subject. A Bill was passed at the last Session of the Councilto deal with the admission and enrolment of Advocates,but I was unable to give my assent to it in the form in which it was passed.

The Bill will again belaid before you and I trust that the form in which itis now drafted will be acceptable to the Council. Amongst the o the r measures which you will beasked to consider the most important are the following:A Bill to consolidate and amend the Laws relatingto the administration of the estates of deceasedOttoman subjects.

A Bill to regulate the admission of certain evidencein criminal cases. A Bill to facilitate the recovery of possession ofTenements after the termination of the tenancy; anda measure, which I am informed is of great importanceto the agricultural interests, prohibiting the exportationof manure.

It is my most anxious desire, in nhich I am sureyou will all participate, that the coming Session maybe prodnctiA'c of such legislative results as may proveof lasting benefit to the welfare and prosperity of the Island. The Council shares your Excellency's gratificationat the abundant cereal harvest of the past yearand it regrets that the prices in foreign markets werenot favourable.

The Council also regrets that the general conditionof the Island has not. The Council considers it its duty to call the attention of the Government to the exceptional positionof thc Island in regard to foreign markets, where itsproduce is burdened with heavy duties, and it considersthat Cyprus should ei the r enjoy the privileges concededby foreign countries to British trade or that it shouldhave the same rights which the former Government of the Island had and can still obtain by Conventions.

It is to be regretted that, although the crop ofcarobs was small, the prices were low. The Councilinvites the attention of the Govemment to the damagecaused to carob trees in some parts of the Island by the ravages of an insect and of rats. As regards thc question of cholera, the Councilcan but repeat its recommendations that the Governmentsliould continue to ttikc.

The Council thanks your Excellency for the measures that have been adopted for the destructionof locusts. These measures have been rej eatedly recommendedby the Council and the y are, in its opinion, the best. The Council urges the Government to see that the se measures are carried out with regularity andintegrity and, as far as the Elective Members are concerned, the y will not fail to do all in the ir power tourge the inhabitants to give the ir assistance in amatter that so closely concerns the m.

The Council has heard with regret of the aboUtionof the Revenue Survey aud thinks that, as the rehas so often been a question about this matter, it maybe allowed to add that the Council has never askedfor such abolition. What it censured and considered illegal and unjustwas the assessment which is made at the new registrationbecause it is not authorised by any law, andbecause it always resulted in favour of the Govemmentand to the detriment of the owners of land, as itwas a partial one.

The Council awaits with anxiety to hear the measures of which your Excellency makes mentioaifor the improvement of the Land Registry Office, the radical reorganization of which the Council has repeatedlyand earnestly recommended. The Council observes that your Excellency haspassed over in silence the most defective branch of the public service— the Police, but it is confident thatyour Excellency has given your earnest care to the recommendations that have been specially made aboutthis Department, which is a most important one fromevery point of view.

Lastly the Council warmly recommends to yourExcellency that you will call the earnest attention ofHer Majesty's Government to the fact that the peopleof Cyprus are no longer able, without being ruined, topay the most exhausting taxes which are beyond itsfinancial means to pay and for the collection of whicha great part of the moveable and immoveable propertyof the tax-payers has been put up to forced sale by the Govemment.

The Council will give its best consideration toall bills that may be laid before it. The Police Force had not failed. The Councilwill be invited to consider measures to place the Forceon a satisfactory and efficient footing. Ihe Cyprus Gatette may be obtained on payment of a subscription of. The subscription includes postage.

This Law may be cited as " The Forest Law, Printed at the Govemment Printing Office, Nicosia. And Whereas, by the said Order, it was, amongsto the r things, provided that the High Commissionershould publish the said Order by Proclamation at suchtime as he thinks fit, and should, in such Proclamation,name a day on which the Order should takeeffect.

Now the refore I, Walter Joseph Sendall, the saidHigh Commissioner, do by this my Proclamationhereby publish the said Order of Her Majesty TheQueen in Council of the 23rd day of November, ,and do hereby name the 1st day of April, , as the day on which the said Order shall take effect. Given at Nicosia this 10th day of March, UNDER the power and authority vested in him by"ThePost Office Ordinance ," and by andwith the advice of the Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order,and it is hereby ordered, that, from and after the 1stday of April, , the rate of postage'to be chargedby or under the Island Postmaster in respect of everysingle newspaper or periodical and supplement notexceeding 2 ozs.

Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 1st day ofMarch, IN exercise of the powers vested in him by "The Post Office Ordinance, ," and with the advice of the Executive Council, His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, and it is herebyordered, that, from and after the publication of this order in the Official Gazette, the following rates ofpostage shall be charged by or under the Island Postmaster in respect of parcels posted in Cyprus for conveyanceto the undermentioned places.

For a Parcel not exceeding n weight1 lb. Bechuanaland Protectorate IMashonaland Protectorate ISIduday of' March, ,And Whereas ittia desirable that ano the r dayshouldbe fixed in lieu of the said 12th day of March. Now the refore, His ExGellenfiy. Given- under the hand and official seal of the HighCommissioner at Nicoeia this 6th day of Maroh,i Given under the hand and official seal of- the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 12th day ofMarch, ,R.

Stationery and PrintingCourt expenses ContingenciesBalance in hand on the Slst December, Yearended the 31st of Dec, ,. Dated 18th Feb. Dated 21st February, New, the refore, in exercise of the powers vested inhim by "The Burials Law, ," His Excellency the High Commissioner is pleased to order, and it ishereby ordered, that new burial-grounds shall beprovided in lieu of those hereinbefore mentioned.

Table shoiving the Rainfall registered at the variousOhservatories in Cyprvs during the month of February, Greatest fall in 24 hrs. Number ofAmount. Dated the 15th day of March, Marshals of the said Court. Bovine TyphusCattle PlagueF. Secretary to Government. Applications to be made to. Be it the refore enacted by His Excellency the High Commissionerand Commander-in-Chief of the Island of Cyprus, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council the reof, as follows:—1.

In addition to the sums already appropriated to the service of the Queen under Her Majesty's Orders in Council of the 80th ofNovember, section 27 , and of the 3rd of August, , the re shall be issued and applied to the service of the twelvemonths ending the thirty-first day of March, , any sum notexceeding the sum of ninety-eight thousand, seven hundred andseventy-three pounds for defraying the charge of the Governmentof Cyprus for such period.

This Law may be cited as " The Appropriation Law, Short Title. His Excellency the High Commissioner Legislative Council Chief Secretary 2, Government Printing Office Receiver-General 12, Audit Public Works and Store Department 1, Public Works 10, Land Registration and Revenue Survey 2, Forests 3, District Establishments 11, Customs and Excise 6, Post Office 2, Law and Justice Education 4, Police 24, Prisons 6, Crown Agents Pensions 1, Printed at the Government Printing Uffice, Nicosia.

The Cjrprus Gazette Published by Authority. Grant forQuarterJanuary 1 toMarch 31, Grant forQuarterApril 1 toJune 30, Grant forQuarterJuly 1 toSeptember 30,. Total Grantfor year Grant forQaarterJantiary 1 toMarch 31, Grant forQuarterApril! July 1 toSeptember Grant tatQuarterOctober 1 toDecember 31,S.

Total Grantfor Year Grant forQuarterJanuary 1 toMarch Grant forQnarterApril 1 toJune 30, Grant forQuarterJuly 1 toSeptember 30, Grant forQuarterOctober 1 toDecember 31, Agirda10 01 5 Amount Granted. Given under the hand and official seal of the High Commissioner at Nicosia this 30th day ofMarch, Balanfee, viz.

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If you are looking for help, advice or support in relation to your gambling, please go to: BeGambleAware. Sign in. Log into your account. Password recovery. Forgot your password? Get help. Wednesday, 10 February Spain - Copa del Rey. Sevilla vs Barcelona Coppa Italia. Atalanta vs Napoli Editor's Pick for today. England - FA Cup. England - Championship. Reading vs Brentford Coupe de France. Mirren vs Celtic He is now clean, but if his garments brush against ours, he is lost. The people we meet in the grounds step aside with great respect to let us pass, but if we offer them our hands, no one would dare to touch a finger's tip.

Here is the gate : a double screen of wire, with an interval between, so that contact is impossible. There is a crowd of individuals outside, all anxious to execute commissions. Among them is the agent of the hotel, who proposes to fill our bare rooms with furniture, send us a servant and cook, and charge us the same as if we lodged with him. The bargain is closed at once, and he hurries off to make the arrangements.

But there is no food within the Quarantine except a patch of green wheat, and a well in the limestone rock. We two Americans join company with our room-mate, an Alexandrian of Italian parentage, who has come to Beyrout to be married, and make the tour of our territory. There is a path along the cliffs overhanging the sea, with glorious views of Lebanon, up to his snowy top, the pine- forests at his base, and the long cape whereon the city lies at full length, reposing beside the waves.

The Mahommedans and Jews, in companies of ten to save expense , are lodged in the smaller dwellings, where they have already aroused mil- lions of fleas from their state of torpid expectancy. The first is a gentleman in every sense of the word, the latter endurable, but the young Absalom is my aversion. I am subject to involuntary likings and dislikings, for which I can give no reason, and though the man may be in every way amiable, his presence is very distasteful to me.

We take a pipe of consolation, but it only whets our appe- tites. We give up our promenade, for exercise is still worse ; and at last the sun goes down, and yet no sign of dinner. Our pavilion becomes a Tower of Famine, and the Italian recites Dante. Finally a strange face appears at the door. By Api- cius! We go stealthily down to the kitchen, and watch the unpacking. Our dinner is there, sure enough, but alas I it is not yet cooked.

So closes the first day of our incarceration. This morning dawned clear and beautiful. Lebanon, except his snowy crest, was wrapped in the early shadows, but the Mediterranean gleamed like a shield of sapphire, and Beyrout, sculptured against the background of its mulberry groves, was glorified beyond all other cities. The turf around our pavilion fairly blazed with the splendor of the yellow daisies and crim- son poppies that stud it.

I was satisfied with what I saw, and felt no wish to leave Quarantine to-day. Our Italian friend, however, is more impatient. His betrothed came early to see him, and we were edified by the great alacrity with which he hastened to the grate, to renew his vows at two yards' distance from her.

In the meantime, I went down to the Turkish houses, to cultivate the acquaintance of a singular character I met on board the steamer. He is a negro of six feet four, dressed in a long scarlet robe. His name is Mahommed Senoosee, and he is a fakeer, or holy man, from Timbuctoo.

He has been two years absent from home, on a pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, and is now on his way to Jerusalem and Damascus. He has travelled extensively in all parts of Cen- tral Africa, from Dar-Fur to Ashantee, and professes to be on good terms with the Sultans of Houssa and Bornou. He has even been in the great kingdom of Waday, which has never been explored by Europeans, and as far south as lola, the capi- tal of Adamowa. Of the correctness of his narrations I have not the least doubt, as they correspond geographically with all that we know of the interior of Africa.

He was very curious to obtain information about America, and made notes of all that I told him, in the quaint character used by the Mughreb- bins, or Arabs of the West, which has considerable resem- blance to the ancient Cufic. He wishes to join company with me for the journey to Jerusalem, and perhaps I shall accept him. Simday, April As Quarantine is a sort of limbo, without the pale of civi- lized society, we have no church service to-day.

We have done the best we could, however, in sending one of the outside dragomen to purchase a Bible, in which we succeeded. I tried vainly in Cairo aud Alex- andria to find a missionary who would supply my heathenish destitution of the Sacred Writings; for I had reached the East through Austria, where they are prohibited, and to travel through Palestine without them, would be like sailing without pilot or compass.

It gives a most impressive reality to Solo- mon's " house of the forest of Lebanon," when you can look up from the page to those very forests and those grand mountains, '' excellent with the cedars. He is tolerably well informed, having read the Books of Moses and the Psalms of David, but, like all Mahommedans, his ideas of religion consist mainly of forms, and its reward is a sensual paradise. Shekh Mahommed Senoosee scarcely ever utters a sentence in which is not the word '' Allah," and '' La illah il' Allah " is repeated at least every five minutes.

Those of his class consi- der that there is a peculiar merit in the repetition of the names and attributes of God. They utterly reject the doctrine of the Trinity, which they believe implies a sort of partnership, or God-firm to use their own words , and declare that all who accept it are hopelessly damned.

To deny Mahomet's prophet- ship would excite a violent antagonism, and I content myself with making them acknowledge tnat God is greater than all Prophets or Apostles, and that there is but one God for all the human race. I have never yet encountered that bitter spirit of bigotry which is so frequently ascribed to them; but on the contrary, fully as great a tolerance as they would find exhibited towards them by most of the Christian sects.

This morning a paper was sent to us, on which we were requested to write our names, ages, professions, and places of nativity. We conjectured that we were subjected to the sus- picion of political as well as physical taint, but happily this was not the case.

I registered myself as a voyagmr, the French as negocians, and when it camo to the woman's turn, Absalom, who is a partisan of female progress, wished to give her the same profession as her husband — a machinist. But she declared that her only profession was that of a ''married woman," and she was so inscribed. No sooner had she departed, than he took his pocket telescope, slowly sweeping the circuit of the bay as she drew nearer and nearer Beyrout.

He has succeeded in distinguish- ing, among the mass of buildings, the top of the house in which she lives, but alas! I have succeeded in obtaining some further particulars in relation to Quarantine. On the night of our arrival, as we were about getting into our beds, a sudden and horrible gush of brimstone vapor came up stairs, and we all fell to coughing like patients in a pulmonary hospital.

The odor increased till we were obliged to open the windows and sit beside them in order to breathe comfortably. This was the preparatory fumi- gation, in order to remove the ranker seeds of plague, after which the milder symptoms will of themselves vanish in the pure air of the place.

Several times a day we are stunned and overwhelmed with the cracked brays of three discordant trumpets, as grating and doleful as the last gasps of a dying donkey. At first I supposed the object of this was to give a greater agitation to the air, and separate and shake down the noxious exhalations we emit ;. Yesterday evening the medical attendant, a Polish physician, came in to inspect us, but he made a very hasty review, looking down on us fi'om the top of a high horse.

Monday, April Talking to day with the guardiano, he happened to mention that he had been three years in Quarantine, keeping watch over infected travellers. It were better to suppose ourselves under suspicion of the plague, than to have such an explanation of the mystery.

Yet, in spite of the unpalatable knowledge, I almost regret that this is our last day in the establishment. The air is so pure and bracing, the views from our windows so magnificent, the colonized branch of the Beyrout Hotel so comfortable, that I am content to enjoy this pleasant idleness — the more pleasant since, being involuntary, it is no weight on the con- science. To-day my friend from Timbuctoo came up to have another talk.

He was curious to know the object of my travels, and as he would not have comprehended the exact truth, I was obliged to convey it to him through the medium of fiction. I informed him that I had been dispatched by the Sultan of my country to obtain information of the countries of Africa; that I wrote in a book accounts of everything I saw, and on my return, would present this book to the Sultan, who would re- ward me with a high rank — perhaps even that of Grand Vizier.

The Orientals deal largely in hyperbole, and scatter numbers and values with the most reckless profusion. The Arabic, like th-e Hebrew, its sister tongue, and other old original tongues of Man, is a language of roots, and abounds with the boldest metaphors. Now, exaggeration is but the imperfect form of metaphor. The expression is always a splendid amplification of the simple fact.

Like skilful archers, in order to hit the mark they aim above it. When you have once learned his standard of truth, you can readily gauge an Arab's expressions, and regulate your own accordingly. But whenever I have attempted to strike the key-note myself, I generally found that it was below, rather than above, the Oriental pitch. The Shekh had already informed me that the King of Ashan- tee, whom he had visited, possessed twenty-four houses full of gold, and that the Sultan of Houssa had seventy thousand horses always standing saddled before his palace, in order that be might take his choice, when he wished to ride out.

In order to giv. I told him, therefore, that our country was two J ears' journey in extent, that the Treasury consisted of four thousand houses filled to the roof with gold, and that two hun- dred thousand soldiers on horseback kept continual guard around Sultan Fillmore's palace. He received these tremendous statements with the utmost serenity and satisfaction, carefully writing them in his book, together with the name of Sultan Fillmore, whose fame has ere this reached the remote regions of Tim uctoo.

The Shekh, moreover, had the desire of visiting England, and wished me to give him a letter to the English Sultan. This rather exceeded my powers, but I wrote a simple certificate explaining who he was, and whence he came, which I sealed with an immense display of wax, and gave him. In return, he wrote his name in my book, in the Mughrebbin char- acter, adding the sentence : " There is no God but God. The gentlemanly Frenchman is a sensible and consistent republican, the old Jilatmr a violent monarchist, while Absa- lom, as I might have foreseen, is a Red, of the schools of Proud- hon and Considerant.

The first predicted a Republic in France, the second a Monarchy "in America, and the last was in favor of a general and total demolition of all existing sys- tems. In the midst of it, I was struck by the cordiality with which the Monarchist and the SociaUst united in their denunciations of England and the English laws. The physician again visited us to-night, to promise a release to-morrow morning. He looked us all in the faces, to be cer- tain that there were no signs of pestilence, and politely regret- ted that he could not offer us his hand.

The husband of the " married woman" also came, and relieved the other gentlemen from the charge of the "weeper. Today, being the last of our imprisonment, we have received many tokens of attention from dragomen, who have sent their papers through the grate to us, to be returned to-morrow after our liberation.

They are not very prepossessing specimens of their class, with the exception of Yusef Badra, who brings a recommendation from my friend, Ross Browne. Yusef is a handsome, dashing fellow, with something of the dandy in his dress and air, but he has a fine, clear, sparkling eye, with just enough of the devil in it to make him attractive. He has not asked us for the place, which displays so much penetration on his part, that we shall end by offering it to him.

Perhaps he is content to rest his claims upon the memory of our first Quarantine dinner. If so, the odors of the cutlets and larks — even of the raw onion, which we remember with tears — shall not plead his cause in vain. Beyeout out of Quarantine , Wednesday, May The handsome Greek, Diamanti, one of the proprietors of the '' Hotel de Belle Yue," was on hand bright and early yes- terday morning, to welcome us out of Quarantine.

The gates were thrown wide, and forth we issued between two files of soldiers, rejoicing in our purification. We walked through mul- berry orchards to the town, and through its steep and crooked streets to the hotel, which stands beyond, near the extremity of the Cape, or Ras Beyrout. The town is small, but has an active population, and a larger commerce than any other port in Syria.

The anchorage, however, is an open road, and in stormy weather it is impossible for a boat to land. There are two picturesque old castles on some rocks near the shore, but they were almost destroyed by the English bombardment iu I noticed two or three granite columns, now used as the lintels of some of the arched ways in the streets, and other fragments of old masonry, the only remains of the ancient Berytus.

Our time, since our release, has been occupied by prepara- tions for the journey to Jerusalem. I learn that tlie Druses are in revolt in Djebel Hauaran and parts of the Anti-Lebanon, which will prevent my forming any settled plan for the tour through Palestine and Syria. Up to this time, the country has been considered quite safe, the only robbery this winter having been that of tlie party of Mr. Degen, of Xew York, which was plundered near Tiberias.

Robinson left here two weeks ago for Jerusalem, in corapany with Dr. Eli Smith, of the American Mission at this place. Ramlbh, April 27, We left Beyrout on the morning of the 22d. Our caravan consisted of three horses, three mules, and a donkey, in charge of two men — Dervish, an erect, black-bearded, and most impassive Mussulman, and Mustapha, who is the very picture of patience and good-nature.

He was born with a smile on his face, and has never been able to change the expression. They are both masters of their art, and can load a mule with a speed and skill which I would defy any Santa Ee trader to excel. The animals are not less interesting than their masters.

Our horses, to be sure, are slow, plodding beasts, with consi- derable endurance, but little spirit ; but the two baggage- mules deserve gold medals from the Society for the Promotion THE MULES. I can overlook any amount of waywardness in the creatures, in consideration of the steady, persevering energy, the cheerfulness and even enthusiasm with which they perform their duties.

They seem to be conscious that they are doing well, and to take a delight in the consciousness. One of them has a band of white shells around his neck, fastened with a tassel and two large blue beads; and you need but look at him to see that he is aware how becoming it is. He thinks it was given to him for good conduct, and is doing his best to merit another. The little donkey is a still more original animal.

He is a practical humorist, full of perverse tricks, but all intended for effect, and without a particle of malice. He generally walks behind, running off to one side or the other to crop a mouthful of grass, but no sooner does Dervish attempt to mount him, than he sets off at full gallop, and takes the lead of the caravan.

After having performed one of his feats, he turns around with a droll glance at us, as much as to say : " Did you see that? I can imagine him, after his return to Beyrout, relating his adventures to a company of fellow-donkeys, who every now and then burst into tremendous brays at some of his irresistible dry sayings. I persuaded Mr. Harrison to adopt the Oriental costume, which, from five months' wear in Africa, I greatly preferred to the Frank.

We therefore rode out of Beyrout as a pair of Syrian Beys, while Francois, with his belt, sabre, and pistols, had much the aspect of a Greek brigand. The road crosses the hill behind the city, between the Forest of Fines and a long tract of red sand-hills next the sea. Beyond the mulberry orchards, we entered on wild, half-cultivated tracts, covered with a bewildering maze of blossoms. The hill-side and stony shelves of soil overhang- ing the sea fairly blazed with the brilliant dots of color which were rained upon them.

Here and there, clear, swift rivulets came down from Lebanon, coursing their way between thickets of bloom- ing oleanders. Just before crossing the little river Damoor, FrauQois pointed out, on one of the distant heights, the resi- dence of the late Lady Hester Stanhope. During the after- noon we crossed several offshoots of the Lebanon, by paths incredibly steep and stony, and towards evening reached Saida, the ancient Sidon, where we obtained permission to pitch our tent in a garden.

The town is built on a narrow point of land, jutting out from the centre of a bay, or curve in the coast, and contains about five thousand inhabitants. It is a quiet, sleepy sort of a place, and contains nothing of the old Sidon except a few stones and the fragments of a mole, extending into the sea, The fortress in the water, and the Citadel, are remnants of Yenitian sway.

The clouds gathered after nightfall, and occasionally there was a dash of rain on our tent. But I heard it with the same quiet happiness, as when, in boyhood, sleep- ing beneatli the rafters, I have heard the rain beating all night upon the roof. There is no rest more grateful than that which we take on the turf or the sand, except the rest below it.

We rose in a dark and cloudy morning, and continued our way between fields of barley, completely stained with the bloody hue of the poppy, and meadows turned into golden mosaic by a brilliant yellow daisy. Until noon our road was over a region of alternate meadow land and gentle though stony elevations, making out from Lebanon. We met continually with indications of ancient power and prosperity. The ground was strewn with hewn blocks, and the foundations of buildings remain in many places.

Broken sarcophagi lie half-buried in grass, and the gray rocks of the hills are pierced with tombs. The soil, though stony, appeared to be naturally fertile, and the crops of wheat, barley, and lentils were very flourishing. After rounding the promontory which forms the southern boun- dary of the Gulf of Sidon, we rode for an hour or two over a plain near the sea, and then came down to a valley which ran up among the hills, terminating in a natural amphitheatre.

An ancient barrow, or tumulus, nobody knows of whom, stands near the sea. During the day I noticed two charming little pictures. One, a fountain gushing into a broad square basin of masonry, shaded by three branching cypresses. Two Turks sat on its edge, eating their bread and curdled milk, while their horses drank out of the stone trough below.

The other, an old Mahommedan, with a green turban and white robe, seated at the foot of a majestic sycamore, over the high bank of a stream that tumbled down its bed of white marble rock to the sea. It helped me to account for the wealth of ancient Tyre. The approach to the town, along a beach on which the surf broke with a con- tinuous roar, with the wreck of a Greek vessel in the fore- ground, and a stormy sky behind, was very striking.

It was a wild, bleak picture, the white minarets of the town standing out spectrally against the clouds. We rode up the sand-hills, back of the town, and selected a good eamping-place among the ruins of Tyre. Near us there was an ancient square build- ing, now used as a cistern, and filled with excellent fresh water. The surf roared tremendously on the rocks, on either hand, and the boom of the more distant breakers came to my ear like the wind in a pine forest.

The remains of the ancient sea- wall are still to be traced for the entire circuit of the city, and the heavy surf breaks upon piles of shattered granite columns. Along a sort of mole, protecting an inner harbor on the north side, are great numbers of these columns.

I counted fifteen in one group, some of them fine red granite, and some of the marble of Lebanon. The remains of the pharos and the for- tresses strengthening the sea-wall, were pointed out by the Syrian who accompanied us as a guide, but his faith was a Uttle stronger than mine. He even showed us the ruins of the jetty built by Alexander, by means of which the ancient city, then insulated by the sea, was taken.

The remains of the cause- way gradually formed the promontorj by which the place is now connected with the main land. I saw many of the latter lying in the streets of the town, and an Arab was selling a quantity at auction in the square, as we passed.

They are cut out from a species of dark volcanic rock, by the Bedouins of the mountains. There were half a dozen small coasting vessels lying in the road, but the old harbors are entirely destroyed. Isaiah's prophecy is liter- ally fulfilled : " Howl, ye ships of Tarshish ; for it is laid waste, so that there is no house, no entering in.

He asked us to stop and take coffee, and received us with much grace and dignity. As we rose to leave, a slave brought me a large bunch of choice flowers from his garden. We set out from Tyre at an early hour, and rode along the beach around the head of the bay to the Kas-el-Abiad, the ancient Promontorium Album.

The morning was wild and cloudy, with gleams of sunshine that flashed out over the dark violet gloom of the sea. The surf was magnificent, rolling up in grand billows, which broke and formed again, till the last of the long, falling fringes of snow slid seething up the sand. Something of ancient power was in their shock and roar, and every great wave that plunged and drew back again, called in its solemn bass : " Where are the ships of Tyre?

Through thickets of myrtle and mastic, around which the rue and lavender grew in dense clusters, we reached the foot of the mountain, and began ascending the celebrated Ladder of Tyre. The road is so steep as to resemble a stair- case, and climbs along the side of the promontory, hanging over precipices of naked white rock, in some places three hun- dred feet in height. The surf has worn its foot into hollow caverns, into which the sea rushes with a dull, heavy boom, like distant thunder. The sides are covered with thickets of broom, myrtle, arbutus, ilex, mastic and laurel, overgrown with woodbine, and interspersed with patches of sage, lavender, hyssop, wild thyme, and rue.

The whole moun- tain is a heap of balm ; a bundle of sweet spices. Our horses' hoofs clattered up and down the rounds of the ladder, and we looked our last on Tyre, fading away behind the white hem of the breakers, as we turned the point of the promontory. Another cove of the mountain-coast followed, terminated by the Cape of Nakhura, the northern point of the Bay of Acre. We rode along a stony way between fields of wheat and barley, blotted almost out of sight by showers of scarlet poppies and yellow chrysanthemums.

There were fre- quent ruins : fragments of sarcophagi, foundations of houses, and about half way between the two capes, the mounds of Alexandro-Schoenae. We stopped at a khan, and breakfasted under a magnificent oUve tree, while two boys tended our horses to see that they ate only the edges of the wheat field.

The intense blue of the sea, seen close at hand over a broad field of goldening wheat, formed a dazzling and superb contrast of color. Early in the afternoon we climbed the Ras Nakhura, not so bold and grand, though quite as flowery a steep as the Promontorium Album.

Behind the sea, which makes a deep indentation in the line of the coast, extended the plain, bounded on the east, at two leagues' distance, by a range of hills covered with luxuriant olive groves, and still higher, by the distant mountains of Galilee. The fortifications of Acre were visible on a slight promontory near the middle of the Gulf. From our feet the line of foamy surf extended for miles along the red sand-beach, till it finally became like a chalk-mark on the edge of the field of blue.

We rode down the mountain and continued our journey over the plain of Esdraelon — a picture of summer luxuriance and bloom. The waves of wheat and barley rolled away from our path to the distant olive orchards ; here the water gushed from a stone fountain and flowed into a turf-girdled pool, around which the Syrian women were washing their garments ; there, a garden of orange, lemon, fig, and pomegranate trees in blossom, was a spring of sweet odors, which overflowed the whole land.

We rode into some of these forests, for they were no less, and finally pitched our tent in one of them, belonging to the palace of the former Abdallah Pasha, within a mile of Acre. For an hour before reaching our destination, we had seen it on the left, crossing the hollows on light stone arches. In one place I counted fifty-eight, and in another one hundred and three of these arches, some of which were fifty feet high. Our camp was a charming place : a nest of deep herbage, under two enormous fig-trees, and surrounded by a balmy grove of orange and citron.

It was doubly beau- tiful when the long line of the aqueduct was lit up by the moon, and the orange trees became mounds of ambrosial darkness. In the morning we rode to Acre, the fortifications of which have been restored on the land-side. A ponderous double gate- way of stone admitted us into the city, through what was once, apparently, the court-yard of a fortress. The streets of the town are narrow, terribly rough, and very dirty, but the bazaars are extensive and well stocked.

The principal mosque, whose heavy dome is visible at some distance from the city, is surrounded with a garden, enclosed by a pillared corridor, paved with marble. All the houses of the city are built in the most massive style, of hard, gray limestone or marble, and this circumstance alone prevented their complete destruction during the English bombardment in The marks of the shells are everywhere seen, and the upper parts of the lofty buildings are completely riddled with cannon-balls, some of which remain embedded in the stone.

We made a rapid tour of the town on horseback, followed by the curious glances of the people, who were in doubt whether to consider us Turks or Franks. There were a dozen vessels. The baggage-mules had gone on, so we galloped after them along the hard beach, around the head of the bay. He had good luck, for the waves brought up. Between Acre and Haifa we passed six or eight wrecks, mostly of small trading vessels.

Some were half buried in sand, some so old and mossy that they were fast rotting away, while a few had been recently hurled there. As we rounded the deep curve of the bay, and approached the line of palm-trees girding the foot of Mount Carmel, Haifa, with its wall and Saracenic town in ruin on the hill above, grew more clear and bright in the sun, while Acre dipped into the blue of the Mediterranean.

The town of Haifa, the ancient Caiapha, is small, dirty, and beggarly looking ; but it has some commerce, sharing the trade of Acre in the productions of Syria. It was Sunday, and all the Consular flags were flying. It was an unexpected dehght to find the American colors in this little Syrian town, flying from one of the tallest poles. The people stared at us as we passed, and I noticed among them many bright Frankish faces, with eyes too clear and gray for Syria.

We ascended to Mount Carmel. John's bread, are produced. After this we came into an olive grove at the foot of the mountain, from wnich long fields of wheat, giving forth a ripe summer smell, flowed down to the shore of the bay. The olive trees were of immense size, and I can well believe, as Era Carlo informed us, that they were probably planted by the Roman colonists, established there by Titus.

The gnarled, veteran boles still send forth vigorous and blossoming boughs. There were all manner of lovely lights and shades chequered over the turf and the wind- ing path we rode. As our horses slowly climbed to the Convent of St. EUjah, whence we already saw the French flag floating over the shoulder of the mountain, the view opened grandly to the north and east, revealing the bay and plain of Acre, and the coast as far as Ras Nakhura, from which we first saw Mount Carmel the day previous.

The two views are very similar in character, one being the obverse of the other. We reached the Convent — Dayr Mar Elias, as the Arabs call it — at noon," just in time to partake of a bountiful dinner, to which the monks had treated themselves.

Carlo, the good Fran- ciscan who receives strangers, showed us the building, and the Grotto of Elijah, which is under the altar of the Convent Church, a small but very handsome structure of Italian marble. The sanctity of the Grotto depends on tradition entirely, as there is no mention in the Bible of Elijah having resided on Carmel, though it was from this mountain that he saw the 'jioud, " hke a man's hand," rising from the sea.

The Convent, which is quite new — not yet completed, in fact — is a large, massive building, and has the aspect of a fortress. In the afternoon we passed the ruins of Athlit, a town of the Middle Ages, and the Castel Pellegrino of the Crusaders. Our road now followed the beach, nearly the -whole distance to Jaffa, and was in many places, for leagues in extent, a solid layer of white, brown, purple and rosy shells, which cracked and rattled under our horses' feet.

Tantura is a poor Arab village, and we had some difiBculty in procuring provisions. The people lived in small huts of mud and stones, near the sea. The place had a thievish look, and we deemed it best to be careful in the disposal of our baggage for the night. In the morning we took the coast again, riding over millions of shells. A line of sandy hills, covered with thickets of myrtle and mastic, shut off the view of the plain and meadows between the sea and the hills of Samaria.

After three hours' ride we saw the ruins of ancient Caesarea, near a small pro- montory. The road turned away from the sea, and took the wild plain behind, which is completely overgrown with camo- mile, chrysanthemum and wild shrubs. The ruins of the town are visible at a considerable distance along the coast. It was formerly surrounded by a deep moat. Within this space, which may be a quarter of a mile square, are a few fragments of buildings, and toward the sea, some high arches and masses of masonry.

The plain around abounds with traces of houses, streets, and court-yards. Paul passed througli it on hi? During the day the path struck inland over a vast rolling plain, covered with sage, lavender and other sweet-smelling shrubs, and tenanted by herds of gazelles and flocks of large storks. As we advanced further, the landscape became singu- larly beautiful. It was a broad, shallow valley, swelling away towards the east into low, rolling hills, far back of which rose the blue line of the mountains — the hill-country of Judea.

Where it lay fallow it was entirely hidden by a bed of grass and camomile. Here and there great herds of sheep and goats browsed on the herbage. There was a quiet pastoral air about the landscape, a soft serenity in its forms and colors, as if the Hebrew patriarchs still made it their abode. The district is famous for robbers, and we kept our arms in readiness, never suffering the baggage to be out of our sight.

Towards evening, as Mr. He appeared to be struck with terror on seeing us making towards him, and, turning his horse's head, made an attempt to fly. The animal, however, was restive, and, after a few plunges, refused to move. The traveller gave himself up for lost ; his arms dropped by his side ; he stared wildly at us, with pale face and eyes opened wide with a look of helpless fright.

I then repeated, with as much distinctness as I could command : " Did — you — leave — Jaffa — to-day? When we last saw him, he was standing as we left him, apparently not yet recovered from the shock. It is enclosed in a mosque, crowning the top of a hill.

I was admitted into the court-yard without hesitation, though, from the porter styling me "Effendi," he probably took me for a Turk. At the entrance to the inner court, I took off my slippers and walked to the tomb of the Sultan — a square heap of white marble, in a small marble enclosure. In one of the niches in the wall, near the tomb, there is a very old iron box, with a slit in the top. The por- ter informed me that it contained a charm, belonging to Sul- tan Ali, which was of great use in producing rain in times of drouth.

In the morning we sent our baggage by a short road across the country to this place, and then rode down the beach towards Jaffa. Our view was confined to the sanu-udls — sometimes covered with a flood of scarlet pop- pies — on one hand; and to the bine, surf- fringed sea on the other.

The terrible coast was still lined with wrecks, and just before reaching the town, we passed a vessel of some two hundred tons, recently cast ashore, with her strong hull still unbroken. We forded the rapid stream of El Anjeh, which comes down from the Plain of Sharon, the water rising to our saddles. The low promontory in front now broke into towers and white domes, and great masses of heavy walls. The aspecc or Jaffa is exceedingly picturesque. It is built on a hill, and the land for many miles around it being low and flat, its topmost houses overlook all the fields of Sharon.

The old harbor, proiecced by a reef of rocks, is on the north side of the town, out is now so sanded up that large vessels cannot enter. A number of small craft were lying close to the shore. The port presented a different scene when the ships of Hiram, King 01 Tyre, came in with the materials for the Temple of Solomon. There is but one gate on the land side, which is rather strongly fortified.

Outside of this there is an open space, wnic'u we found filled with venders of oranges and vege- tables, camel-men and the like, some vociferating in loud dis- pute, some given up to silence and smoke, under the shade of the sycamores. We rode under the heavily arched and towered gateway, and entered the bazaar. The street was crowded, and there was such a confusion of camels, donkeys, and men, that we made our way with difficulty along the only practicable street in the city, to the sea-side, where Francois pointed out a hole in the wall as the veritable spot where Jonah was cast JAFFA.

This part of the harbor is the recep- tacle of all the offal of the town ; and I do not wonder that the whale's stomach should have turned on approaching it. The sea-street was filled with merchants and traders, and we were obliged to pick our way between bars of iron, skins of oil, heaps of oranges, and piles of building timber.

At last we reached the end, and, as there was no other thoroughfare, returned the same way we went, passed out the gate, and took the road to Ramleh and Jerusalem. But 1 hear the voice of Frangois, announcing, " Messieurs, le dim? Our horses are enjoy- ing their barley ; and Mustapha stands at the tent-door tying up his sacks.

Dogs are barking and donkeys braying all along the borders of the toAvn, whose filth and dilapidation are happily coucealed by the fig and olive gardens which sur- round it. I have not curiosity enough to visit the Greek and Latin Convents embedded in its foul purlieus, but content myself with gazing from my door upon the blue hills of Palestine, which we must cross to-morrow, on our way to Jerusalem.

Leaving the gate of Jaffa, we rode eastward between delight- ful gardens of fig, citron, orange, pomegranate and palm. The orange trees were in bloom, and at the same time laden down with ripe fruit. The dark foliage of the pome- granate fairly blazed with its heavy scarlet blossoms, and here and there a cluster of roses made good the Scriptural' renown of those of Sharon.

The road was filled with people, passing to and fro, and several families of JafiFa Jews were having a sort of pic-nic in the choice shady spots. Ere long we came to a fountain, at a point where two roads met. It was a large square structure of limestone and marble, with a stone trough in front, and a delightful open chamber at the side.

The space in front was shaded with immense syca- more trees, to which we tied our horses, and then took our seats in the window above the fountain, where the Greek brought us our breakfast. The water was cool and delicious, as were our Jaffa oranges. It was a charming spot, for as we sat we could look under the boughs of the great trees, and down between the gardens to Jaffa and the Mediterranean.

After leaving the gardens, we came upon the great plain of Sharon, on which we could see the husbandmen at work far and near, ploughing and sowing their grain. In some instances, the two operations were made simultaneously, by having a sort of funnel attached to the plough-handle, running into a tube which entered the earth just behind the share.

The man held the plough with one hand, while with the other he dropped the requisite quan- tity of seed through the tube into the furrow. The people are ploughing now for their summer crops, and the wheat and bar- ley which they sowed last winter are already in full head. On other parts of the plain, there were large flocks of sheep and goats, with their attendant shepherds.

So ran the rich land- scape, broken only by belts of olive trees, to the far hills of Judea. Riding on over the long, low swells, fragrant with wild thyme and camomile, we saw at last the tower of Ramleh, and down the valley, an hour's ride to the north-east, the minaret of Ludd, the ancient Lydda. Still further, I could see the houses of the village of Sharon, embowered in olives.

Ramleh is built along the crest and on the eastern slope of a low hill, and at a distance appears like a stately place, but this impres- sion is immediately dissipated on entering it. West of the town is a large square tower, between eighty and ninety feet in height. We rode up to it through an orchard of ancient olive trees, and over a field of beans. The tower is evidently a min- aret, as it is built in the purest Saracenic style, and is sur- rounded by the ruins of a mosque.

I have rarely seen any- thing more graceful than the ornamental arches of the uppei portions. Over the door is a lintel of white marble, with an Arabic inscription. The subterranean cisterns, under the court-yard, amazed me with their extent and magnitude. They are no less than twenty-four feet deep, and covered by twenty-four vaulted ceilings, each twelve feet square, and rest- ing on massive pillars. The mosque, when entire, must have been one of the finest in Syria.

We clambered over the broken stones cumbering the entrance, and mounted the steps to the very summit. The view reached from Jaffa and the sea to the mountains near Jerusalem, and southward to the plain of Ascalon — a great expanse of grain and grazing land, all blossoming as the rose, and dotted, espe- cially near the mountains, with dark, luxuriant olive-groves.

The shadows of fleecy clouds, drifting slowly from east to west, moved across the landscape, which became every moment softer and fairer in the light of the declining sun. I did not tarry in Ramleh. The streets are narrow, crooked, and filthy as only an Oriental town can be.

The houses have either flat roofs or domes, out of the crevices in which springs a plentiful crop of weeds. Some yellow dogs barked at us as we passed, children in tattered garments stared, and old tur- baned heads were raised from the pipe, to guess who the two brown individuals might be, and why they were attended by such a fierce cawass. Passing through the eastern gate, we were gladdened by the sight of our tents, already pitched in the meadow beside the cistern.

Dervish had arrived an hour before us, and had everything ready for the sweet lounge of an hour, to which we treat ourselves after a day's ride. I watched the evening fade away over the blue hills before us, and tried to convince myself that I should reach Jerusalem on the mor- row.

Was it possible that I was in Judea? I must believe it. Yet it seemed once that if I ever trod that earth, then beneath my feet, there would be thenceforth a consecra- tion in my life, a holy essence, a purer inspiration on the lips, a surer faith in the heart. Fran- Qois was suspicious of some of them, and therefore divided the night into three watches, which were kept by himself and our two men. Mustapha was the last, and kept not only himself, but myself, wide awake by his dolorous chants of love and reli- gion.

I fell sound asleep at dawn, but was roused before sunrise by Francois, who wished to start betimes, on account of the rugged road we had to travel. The morning was mild, clear, and balmy, and we were soon packed and in motion. Leaving the baggage to follow, we rode ahead over the fertile fields. The wheat and poppies were glistening with dew, birub sang among the fig-trees, a cool breeze came down from the hollows of the hills, and my blood leaped as nimbly and joyously as a young hart on the mountains of Betber.

Between Ramleh and the hill-country, a distance of about eight miles, is the rolling plain of Arimathea, and this, as well as the greater part of the plain of Sharon, is one of the richest districts in the world. The soil is a dark-brown loam, and, without manure, produces annually superb crops of wheat and barley.

We rode for miles through a sea of wheat, waving far and wide over the swells of land. The tobacco in the fields about Ramleh was the most luxuriant I ever saw, and the olive and fig attain a size and lusty strength wholly unknown in Italy. Judea cursed of God! Give Palestine into Christian hands, and it will again flow with ciilk and honey.

Except some parts of Asia Minor, no por- tion of the Levant is capable of yielding such a harvest of grain, silk, wool, fruits, oil, and wine. We gradually ascended the hills, passing one or two villages, imbedded in groves of olives. In the little valleys, slanting down to the plains, the Arabs were still ploughing and sowing, singing the while an old love-song, with its chorus of " ya, ghazalee! The valley narrowed, the lowlands behind us spread out broader, and in half an hour more we were threading a narrow pass, between stony hills, overgrown with ilex, myrtle, and dwarf oak.

The wild purple rose of Palestine blossomed on all sides, and a fra- grant white honeysuckle in some places hung from the rocks. The path was terribly rough, and barely wide enough for two persons on horseback to pass each other. We met a few pil- grims returning from Jerusalem, and a straggling company of armed Turks, who had such a piratical air, that without the solemn asseveration of Frangois that the road was quite safe, I should have felt uneasy about our baggage.

Most of the persons we passed were Mussulmen, few of whom gave the customary " Peace be with you! The rock was limestone, or marble, lying in horizontal strata, the broken edges of which rose like terraces to the summits. These shelves were so covered with wild shrubs — in some places even with rows of olive trees — that to me they had not the least appearance of that desola- tion so generally ascribed to them.

In a little dell among the hills there is a small ruined mosque, or chapel I could not decide which , shaded by a group of magnificent terebinth trees. Several Arabs were resting in its shade, and we hoped to find there the water we were looking for, in order to make breakfast.

But it was not to be found, and we climbed nearly to the summit of the first chain of hills, where in a small olive orchard, there was a cistern, filled by the late rains. It belonged to two ragged boys, who brought us an earthen vessel of the water, and then asked, " Shall we bring you milk, Pilgrims!

My companion, who had not recovered from his horror at finding that the inhabitants of Ramleh washed themselves in the pool which supplied us and them, refused to touch it. We made but a short rest, for it was now nearly noon, and there were yet many rough miles between us and Jerusalem. We crossed the first chain of mountains, rode a short distance over a stony upland, and then descended into a long cultivated valley, running to the eastward.

At the end nearest us appeared the village of Aboo '1 Ghosh the Father of Lies , which takes its name from a noted Bedouin shekh, who distin- guished himself a few years ago by levying contributions on travellers. He obtained a large sum of money iu this way, but as he added murder to robbery, and fell upon Turks as well as Christians, he was finally captured, and is now expi- ating his offences in some mine on the coast of the Black Sea.

Near the bottom of the village there is a large ruined build- ing, now used as a stable by the inhabitants. The door-way is at the side, and is Gothic, with a dash of Saracenic in the orna- mental mouldings above it. The large window at the extremity of the nave is remarkable for having round arches, which circum- stance, together with the traces of arabesque painted ornaments on the columns, led me to think it might have been a mosque ; but Dr. Robinson, who is now here, considers it a Christian church, of the time of the Crusaders.

The village of Aboo '1 Ghosh is said to be the site of the birth-place of the Prophet Jeremiah, and I can well imagine it to have been the case. The aspect of the mountain-country to the east and north-east would explain the savage dreariness of his lamentations. The whole valley in which the village stands, as well as another which joins it on the east, is most assiduously cultivated.

The stony mountain sides are wrought into terraces, where, in spite of soil which resembles an American turnpike, patches of wheat are growing luxuriantly, and olive trees, centuries old, hold on to the rocks with a clutch as hard and bony as the hand of Death. In the bed of the valley the fig tree thrives, and sometimes the vine and fig grow together, forming the patriarchal arbor of shade familiar to us all.

The shoots of the tree are still young and green, but the blossoms of the grape do not yet give forth their goodly savor. I did not hear the voice of the turtle, but a nightingale sang in the briery thickets by the brook side, as we passed along. Climbing out of this valley, we descended by a stony stair- case, as rugged as the Ladder of Tyre, into the Wady Beit- Hanineh.

Here were gardens of oranges in blossom, with orchards of quince and apple, overgrown with vines, and the fragrant hawthorn tree, snowy with its bloom. Our road turned off to the right, and commenced ascending a long, dry glen between mountains which grew more sterile the further we went.

It was nearly two hours past noon, the sun fiercely hot, and our horses were nigh jaded out with the rough road and our impatient spurring. I began to fancy we could see Jerusalem from the top of the pass, and tried to think of the ancient days of Judea. But it was in vain. A newer picture shut them out, and banished even the diviner images of Our Saviour and His Disciples. It lay as far and beautiful as it once seemed to the eye of childhood, and the swords of Seraphim kept profane feet from its sacred hills.

I entered the ranks j I followed the trumpets and the holy hymns, and waited breathlessly for the moment when every mailed knee should drop in the dust, and every bearded and sunburned cheek be wet with devotional tears. But when I climbed the last ridge, and looked ahead with a sort of painful suspense, Jerusalem did not appear. We were two thousand feet above the Mediterranean, whose blue we could dimly see far to the west, through notches in the chain of hills.

To the north, the mountains were gray, desolate, and awful. Not a shrub or a tree relieved their frightful barrenness. An upland tract, covered with white volcanic rock, lay before us. We met peasants with asses, who looked to my eyes as if they had just left Jerusalem. Still forward we urged our horses, and reached a ruined garden, surrounded with hedges of cactus, over which I saw domes and walls in the distance.

I drew a long breath and looked at Francois. He was jogging along without turning his head ; he could not have been so indifferent if that was really the city. Presently, we reached another slight rise in the rocky plain. He began to urge his panting horse, and at the same instant we both lashed the spirit into ours, dashed on at a break-neck gallop, round the corner of an old wall on the top of the hill, and lo!

Our Greek jerked both pistols from his holsters, and fired them into the air, as we reined up on the steep.